Archive | June, 2003

82
3:18 am
June 2, 2003
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Define the Need Before Software Installation

Vital step can save rework and stress. Defining the real need for new software and staying focused is tricky. There are so many variables along the way to a good software implementation that falling off the track is easy. There has to be a central theme to guide the decisions that will be made during […]

114
1:31 am
June 2, 2003
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Reducing Bearing Failures

Implementing these common sense methods and practices will save time and effort, and lower costs. No two companies operate exactly the same way, and maintenance tasks are often performed differently. However, this article will present the most common scenarios and practices on how to reduce bearing failures, based on current information and experience. These methods […]

102
9:52 pm
June 1, 2003
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Maintaining Normal Force in Electrical Connections

The most critical decision in aluminum to copper bolted joint design is the selection of the Belleville washer. A previous article by Norman Shackman, P.E. (“The Trouble with Torque in Electrical Connections,” MT 11/02, pg. 24) correctly stated that two of the secrets to making and keeping reliable electrical connections are clean contact surfaces and […]

62
7:29 pm
June 1, 2003
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Tackling the Skills Shortage

Educational system and training programs should be adjusted. The baby boom generation, the last one that produced significant numbers of craftspeople, is retiring. Between the retirements and the scarcity of entry-level craftspeople, we have a severe and accelerating crisis—a nationwide shortage of technically qualified people for our manufacturing industries. It is a dual shortage: 1. […]

73
6:53 pm
June 1, 2003
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Plug and Play Complexity

Robert C. Baldwin, CMRP, Editor Maintenance and reliability information is very complex. But just how complex is difficult for many of us to understand. We tend to think in terms of paper (work orders, drawings, reports) or common computer files (spreadsheets, basic flat-file databases). Although I have been following maintenance information systems for years, I […]

360
4:56 pm
June 1, 2003
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Measuring Backlog

Second in a series of articles discussing the management of backlog The first article in this series, “Essential Elements of Backlog Measurement and Analysis,” defined backlog as the classification of work that, for whatever reason, has not been completed. Measuring backlog allows a manager to set priorities. As previously stated, because backlog is measured in […]

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