Author Archive | Jane Alexander

35

2:55 pm
April 18, 2017
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On The Floor: Management Rapport? Thumbs Up and Down

Mechanical and electrical plant roomsBy Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

For some reason, the following question about management rapport really kicked MT Reader Panelists into high gear this month. Lots of them (more than usual) wanted to express their opinions (some in far more detail than they typically provide). The result is that we can’t include all responses on these two pages. (You’ll want to check out a greatly expanded online version at maintenancetechnology.com.)

Q: What was the state of rapport between their sites’ plant-floor reliability and/or maintenance teams (or their clients’/customers’ teams) and upper management, and why?

Here are a few of the responses we received. As usual, they’ve been edited for clarity and brevity.

Industry Consultant, West…
Management rapport [with maintenance and reliability teams] is one of the main indicators I use when working at a new [client] site. If there’s tension between these departments, there will be communication breakdowns—virtually every time.  Performance will suffer greatly, and each group will blame the others.

In general, I find a good, strong, open, and honest working relationship in less than 30% of my clients’ operations.  If I can resolve issues between the groups, and improve relationships, the parts of the maintenance and reliability puzzle fall into place rather easily. In the age of e-mail, texting, and voicemail, however, it’s much easier for silos to exist and not handle issues face-to-face.  In my opinion, it seems to be getting easier to let site relationships erode rather than repair them.

Maintenance Technician, Discrete Mfg, North America…
Not the greatest here (always a struggle because upper management is constantly looking to cut corners). They call it risk management, yet when something goes wrong, they panic. Some of our older equipment has been paid for many times over. Now, though, we’re into a stage where it’s hard to get parts for this equipment. We [our team] really tries to stress the importance of preventive maintenance (PMs) and taking care of things, as in “if you take care of your stuff, your stuff will take care of you.” But it becomes frustrating when that idea seems to fall on deaf ears and they [management] seem to dodge another bullet. (This opinion is based on personal experience; I’ve been working in this plant for many years.)

Industry Supplier, Southeast…
With regard to my customers, management rapport, in most cases, is still not very good. I work with a lot of plants where plant-floor staff need help, but must get upper management to buy in. Most preventive-maintenance (PM) personnel don’t have the knowledge to make their case. When I’m able to meet with both sides at the table and pitch ROI (return on investment), it seems that they begin to understand each other better, i.e., that the ROI for Management is dollars and the ROI of PM teams is reduced failures and workload.

Reliability Specialist, Power Sector, Midwest…
Our team has an excellent rapport with all levels of the organization.  The secret to good rapport is to not only talk the talk, but to walk the talk. The site’s PdM/PM program mission is to use our knowledge and appropriate technologies on the facility’s assets to provide the operating group safe, efficient, and reliable equipment.  In the same manner, we are to use our knowledge and available technologies to safely and effectively reduce the facility’s operating and maintenance costs.

Industry Supplier, Midwest…
It’s ugly (management rapport, that is)! Many of my plant-floor customers have lost budgets and been reduced to performing reactive work, as opposed to proactive maintenance. They’re dealing with plants that are already in bad shape and disrepair, and answering to management that still wants to run full production. They have no inventories, no spares, and no orders for items with extremely long lead times. It’s not a pretty picture. One ray of hope [a slight improvement] is that site management is now being forced to go to corporate for monies and also discuss why equipment was allowed to go so long without repair. The overall situation, though, leads to pain and agony for those having to do work, that, if it had been done when needed, would have been a simple fix, not a catastrophic fix.  

Industry Consultant, North America…
There’s no guarantee that upper management has a solid understanding of reliability excellence. This is especially true if no executive-level stakeholder exists. Quite often, the focus from the top is solely on cost management (not on failure prevention or defect elimination.) In my experience as a consultant, a common complaint at the working level has focused on incoherent, ongoing initiatives that aren’t solidly linked to goals. This issue could be resolved if long-range plans were created based, say, on ranking of each initiative by priority and benefit and then stretching them out over a period of time. Leadership should encourage these types of plans for excellence, and involve plant personnel in their definition.

Maintenance Leader, Discrete Mfg, Midwest…
As noted in some of my past Reader Panel responses, maintenance used to be the redheaded stepchild at our facility. The problem started with the fact that plant managers and senior managers seemed to come and go [change] frequently. Because of this, “flavor of the month” programs were the norm. This changed with the arrival of an outside consulting firm. When upper management listened to suggestions and our plant-floor personnel saw that their ideas were listened to, maintenance took ownership. This made a big difference with proactive versus reactive work. We’re now getting our preventive maintenance work done as well. Things are looking good.

Reliability Engineering Leader, Process Mfg, South…
If I had been asked this question a couple of years ago, I would have characterized the relationship between management and plant-floor teams as indifferent. It wasn’t adversarial, but more a matter of management viewing maintenance as a necessary evil than a competitive advantage.  That has changed significantly. Last year, leadership announced PM Completion Rate (with a target of 95%) as one of the top metrics for the company. That was a real game changer. Suddenly, everybody was interested in preventive maintenance—it had become part of their personal-performance expectations. Respect for the importance of scheduled maintenance compliance made a dramatic shift, and we exceeded our PM-completion target.  This coming year, unscheduled asset downtime is being added to the top company metrics and will be reviewed on a monthly basis by executive management. This is a clear example of how leadership from the top can really drive change. 

Industry Consultant, International
In answer to your question, this situation [management rapport problems] is brought on by local company politics, lack of training, and basic mismanagement among, other things.

While I’ve worked with various clients, including some where severe adversarial relationships existed between Maintenance and Production/ Upper Management, by coaching ALL responsible parties that state of the art reliability and maintenance saves money, increases OEE (overall equipment effectiveness), improves uptime, and increases productivity, etc. I have convinced maintenance and top management that maintenance/reliability is a business partner NOT a “ we break it/you fix it” stepchild.

After training of top-level maintenance, production and sometimes even general management personnel by professionals in reliability and maintenance management, common goals are identified and cooperation is much improved. Accountants watch the bottom line weighing these additional consultant/training costs against expense reductions and production improvements. Results are that teamwork builds and floor-operations to staff-level relationships smooth out.

“Equipment Ownership,” in selected cases, brings hourly production and maintenance crafts together and reinforces the hourly–personnel through management relationship. Although this has, at times raised, the eyebrows of union officers, they usually go along when the benefits to all are obvious.

Yes, I have seen too many operations where maintenance and production departments, which usually have the ear of top management, DO NOT have a smooth relationship. However, with the proper training and education of all concerned, this can usually be much improve to the economic and management benefit of all.

Plant Engineer, Institutional Facilities, Midwest
With regard to management rapport, for several months, maintenance (trades) forepersons at our institution have had to attend not only new-construction meetings, but even small-project meetings. The idea is that we (Maintenance) can add our concerns before, during, and after projects are completed. The problem with all this is how much time it takes. With so many projects and associated meetings [at our site] and the number of normal maintenance-type meetings we have, we almost always have at least one supervisor sitting in meetings 30 to 40 hours per week. Work for anybody attending these meetings gets pushed back and can delay repairs. It also creates more work for the people not attending.

Another problem we have is that only the person attending the meeting knows what was discussed and/or is coming up. Consequently, that individual has knowledge that other supervisors don’t. The system would work a lot better if one person could attend all the meetings and email a recap of each event so every supervisor would know where each project stands and what’s coming up, whether in his or her area/zone or not.

While most meetings cover such a wide variety of subjects that only 10% to 20% of their agendas can be devoted to individual trades, attendees must listen to everything. It would be better, if you were going to have a one-hour meeting, to break it down into four parts, i.e., plumbing, electrical, mechanical, architectural/structural. This way, a supervisor could attend only the part of the meeting during which his or her area was discussed, not the entire meeting, and, if email recaps were sent out, could still keep up with everything that transpires.

Engineer, Industry Supplier, Southeast
Management’s responsibilities are meeting production deadlines and goals while keeping operating costs to a minimum. The relationship between management and maintenance depends on how management views their maintenance program. Some management personnel look at maintenance as a cost center while others recognize it as a cost savings mechanism or in best case, the profit center. Understanding that maintenance is a part of the cost of the product being created softens the financial burden but also gives management a better perspective regarding the value their maintenance teams bring to the table.

Ours is an equipment-service operation that’s deeply involved in working with our customers to improve their PdM programs. As such we continue to invest a great deal of time educating upper management regarding the benefits of early detection of issues that will lead to premature failures as well as on-going inefficiencies. The more informed management becomes about heading off potential problems, and the tools and preventive measures available, the more they become involved with their maintenance teams. Informed managers will interact with their teams quicker and to a greater extent. Sometimes comparing the benefits of outsourcing major PdM activities is more appealing and acceptable to management personnel as it leaves their operators and technicians time to complete their daily routine assignments.

Maintenance personnel generally understand the need for planned routine maintenance. Their relationship with upper management is greatly improved when their leaders are also informed. Education is the key to improving the relationship between upper management and their maintenance teams as well as a way of improving efficiency and operational success of the facility. MT

Tip of the Month

“Add RED and GREEN colors to the face of standard pressure gauges. This allows anyone who looks at or takes readings on a single gauge (or dozens) to tell right away if a pressure is too low or too high. I’ve worked on equipment and in test labs where this little addition could have saved a lot of time and money, and helped any operator.”

Tipster: Plant Engineer, Institutional Facilities, Midwest (an MT Reader Panelist)

What about you?
Tips and tricks that you use in your work could be value-added news to other reliability and maintenance pros. Let us help you share them. Email your favorites to MTTipster@maintenancetechnology.com. Who knows? You might see your submission(s) highlighted in this space at some point. (Anyone can play. You don’t need to be an
MT Reader Panelist.)

38

8:01 pm
April 13, 2017
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Listen Up: Stop Lube-Related Bearing Failures

Ultrasound technology can help reduce bearing and equipment failures associated with improper lubrication procedures.

Ultrasound technology can help reduce bearing and equipment failures associated with improper lubrication procedures.

Regardless of industry sector, lubrication methods are crucial to plant reliability and maintenance efforts. Consider the fact that lube-related failures account for 60% to 80% of premature bearing failures. While lack of lubrication and use of the wrong lubricant for an application have been cited as major causes of such failures, over- and under-lubrication are also harmful. Preventing those last two scenarios is one area where ultrasound technology can play an important role.

— Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

According to UE Systems (Elmsford, NY), by using an ultrasound instrument to listen to a bearing while applying lubricant and then monitor, i.e., watch, the decibel level, a technician can determine when adequate grease has been applied and, just as important, the threshold at which over-lubrication begins.

In short, when bearings aren’t lubricated properly, friction can cause damage and threaten processes. Ultrasound equipment can read the decibel levels of over- and under-lubricated bearings and indicate to maintenance personnel if adjustments are in order. Consistent dB levels let a technician know that the level of lubrication is where it should be.

Experts at UE Systems describe three tiers of acceptable lubrication practices and where ultrasound technology fits into them.

randmGood practice

The baseline lubrication practice is to follow the bearing manufacturer’s recommendations to determine the exact amount of lubrication necessary based on bearing size, speed, and type, and rely on runtime and operating conditions to develop a lubrication schedule. While “good” is a starting place, there is room to improve.

Better practice

The next level uses ultrasound equipment for more exact lubrication procedures. These tools tell maintenance technicians when to stop lubricating a bearing, rather than hoping the schedule is accurate and guessing at bearing condition. Ultrasound can also inform technicians if there are other problems with the bearing, unrelated to lubrication.

Best practice

A best lubrication practice is to combine a frequency schedule and ultrasound tools with data collection and trend analysis. By examining the history of lubrication with dB levels and other sound files, maintenance technicians can begin to predict when bearings may be approaching failure and take preemptive action. Alarm levels can be set to alert technicians when lubrication is approaching dangerously low levels.

The best ultrasound programs allow easy integration of data analysis with probes, listening devices, and lubrication tools. MT

How Ultrasound Technology Works

Air- and structure-borne ultrasound is high-frequency sound that human ears can’t hear. These high-frequency sounds travel through the air or by way of a solid. The ultrasound instrument senses and listens for the high-frequency sound, and then translates it into an audible sound that is heard through the inspector’s headset. The unit of measurement for sound is a decibel (dB) level, which is indicated on the display of the ultrasonic instrument.

Ultrasound can be used in conjunction with (and is supportive of) vibration analysis and other predictive-maintenance approaches. In addition to mechanical inspections of rotating equipment and associated condition-based lubrication programs, applications for ultrasound include detection of compressed air and gas leaks; inspection of energized electrical equipment to detect corona, tracking, and arcing; and inspection of steam traps.

For more ultrasound information and to download a printable infographic on “3 Ways to Incorporate Ultrasound in Lubrication Testing,” visit uesystems.com.

39

7:53 pm
April 13, 2017
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Prevent Cable Failure in Dynamic-Cable Tracks

Paying attention to these details can help you reduce the risk of unexpected and costly downtime.

Paying attention to these details can help you reduce the risk of unexpected and costly downtime.

Cable failure within a dynamic-cable track can lead to costly, yet, in most cases, easily avoided, downtime. David Smith of U.S. Tsubaki Power Transmission LLC (Wheeling, IL) points to several important considerations for maximizing the performance life of cables running through your plant’s power-transmission-equipment systems.

— Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

Proper cable selection

Incorrect cable designs are often installed in a dynamic-cable track. Given the high rates of motion and speed under which cable tracks perform, be sure to select and install a cable specifically designed to operate in your particular environment or application.

Proper cable-track sizing

To achieve maximum life from your cables, assure ample amounts of free space within the cable track. At a minimum, cables should have 10% free space around them, with a maximum fill rate within the cable track not to exceed 60%. As the speed and cycle rates of a cable track increase, the cables must have adequate space to operate properly.

It is also imperative for the cable track to have the proper bend radius. Dynamic cables are generally designed to operate with a bend radius that’s greater than 7.5 times the outside diameter of the cable. A tighter radius will reduce the performance life of your cables.

randmStrain relief

Every cable requires effective strain relief as it enters and exits the cable track. This strain relief ensures that proper cable length remains within the track as it cycles back and forth. Insufficient strain relief is one of the most commonly overlooked considerations during cable installation.

Proper strain relief often can be accomplished by simply zip-tying the cables to the strain-relief fingers that have been molded into the cable-track brackets.

Internal vertical dividers

Another often-overlooked consideration involves the use of internal dividers within the cable track. Vertical dividers between the cables ensure that each cable is confined to its proper location and spacing within the track and is unable to cross over or “tangle,” with the other cables. Keeping your cables in proper alignment will help extend their performance.

Cable-carrier material selection

Even with proper strain relief, relative motion between the cables and cable carrier crossbars can result in some scuffing of the cable jackets. By selecting a crossbar design/material that best interacts with the cable jacket material, you can reduce or eliminate that scuffing.

For example, a nylon cable track with aluminum crossbars is much friendlier to the PVC jackets of most electrical cables than a standard glass-fiber nylon cross bar. MT

David Smith is director of sales for the Milwaukee-based KabelSchlepp Division of U.S. Tsubaki Power Transmission LLC. For more information on dynamic-cable tracks and other power-transmission topics, visit ustsubaki.com.

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7:33 pm
April 13, 2017
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Develop a ‘Profitable’ Reliability Strategy

Maximizing operational profitability requires maintenance and operations to approach reliability, efficiency, and profitability from a common strategic plane.

Maximizing operational profitability requires maintenance and operations to approach reliability, efficiency, and profitability from a common strategic plane.

Automation systems have primarily been focused on using real-time control to improve the efficiency of industrial operations. But, as process- and logic-control technology and techniques have advanced over the years, control strategies have improved significantly. As a result, plant assets are being pushed harder than ever before—something that’s had an understandably negative impact on their performance and reliability.

The effect of all of this, said Peter G. Martin, Ph.D., of Schneider Electric, Foxboro, MA, is that companies are now paying much more attention to and driving advancements in plant maintenance. Over the past two decades, traditional responsive maintenance has evolved to include preventive, predictive, and prescriptive strategies. According to Martin, while the results have been promising, some in the industry are beginning to realize that improving business performance requires maintenance and operations strategies that collaborate much more than they now do.

“If the ultimate objective is for both maintenance and operations to maximize operational profitability,” Martin wrote, “approaching reliability, efficiency, and profitability from a common strategic plane is essential. This collaborative approach is referred to as profitable reliability.”

randmDeveloping a profitable reliability strategy might seem daunting, but some fairly simple steps can help move industrial operations in the right direction. Martin outlines them here:

• Identify the critical equipment assets that represent the largest opportunity for performance improvement. Those units will frequently be found among your rotating equipment, since mechanical movement tends to wear them out over time.

• Determine what process and condition measurements are required to perform a complete asset-performance analysis. At the base equipment level, this can be a relatively simple exercise. The goal is to measure the maintained state of the equipment (how it is operating compared with its optimal operating condition) and the probability of failure over a specified time.

• Install the appropriate measurement on the asset. Typical process measurements, along with condition measurements, provide substantial reliability information. For example, the amount of process output based on a given energy input might decline as the asset nears failure.

• Use the process and condition measurements to calculate the asset’s maintained state and its probability of failure.

• Use the process and condition measurements, in conjunction with business data, to determine how much the asset contributes to real-time operational profitability. The goal is to maximize that profitability over a given time.

• Determine how much operational (control) freedom each asset has. For example, is the only operating action to turn the asset on and off or is it possible to operate the asset at a less-than-maximum level?

• Develop an asset-control scheme that includes integrated reliability and process-control strategies that maximize operational profitability. These strategies might include reducing the output of the asset to extend its time to failure so you can finish a run or a contract.

• Move the reliability measurement and control up to the next-level asset set (for example, the process unit) and perform the same control-strategy analysis. This analysis should be simpler to perform once the base equipment level assets are under control.

• Continue this process all the way up the asset hierarchy, until you have real-time control strategies in place for all your critical assets and asset sets. This would include process areas, plants, and even enterprises. MT

—Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

Peter G. Martin, Ph.D., is vice president, Marketing and Innovation, for Schneider Electric’s Process Automation business. For more information, visit Schneider-electric.com/processautomation.

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2:19 pm
April 4, 2017
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Emerson All-in-One GO Switch Magnetic Position Sensors Replace Troublesome Mechanical Switches in Tough Services

 

GO Switch magnetic position sensors from Emerson Process Management (Austin, TX) offer an all-in-one-type proximity sensor and limit-switch solution for end users across industry.

Rated for a wide range of applications, GO Switches, according to the manufacturer, enable intelligent and efficient process management  under the most demanding conditions while providing higher reliability, cost savings, and less downtime. A unique mechanism driven by rare-earth magnets is key to the devices’ consistent, durable sensing and control capabilities.

The GO Switch product lineup includes the following designs:

  • Hazardous Area Certified: Suitable for use in flameproof/explosion-proof, non-incendive, intrinsically safe hazardous areas with IECEx, ATEX, GOST, InMetro, UL, CSA, JIS, KOSHA, and NEPSI.
  • General Purpose. Quality engineered to meet ordinary location requirements. Suitable for use in multiple industries, such as automotive, marine, military vehicles, manufacturing, amusement parks, material handling, gaming and entertainment, and heavy equipment. Setting the standard for reliable performance.
  • Nuclear Qualified. Units qualified, and tested to meet AP1000 requirements. Designed for long-life dependability in containment LOCA, containment non-LOCA (Harsh Duty), and Mild duty applications.
  • Extreme (High- and Low-) Temperature. Rated for continuous operation in high temperatures up to 204°C (400 F). Especially useful in steam turbines as well as high heat boilers, dryers, steel processing, and aluminum die-casting. Extreme low temperatures as low as -60°C (-76°F).
  • Submersible. Available with subsea connectors for continuous submersion. GO Switch submersible sensors work at depths of up to 7,010 m/23,000 ft and offer trouble-free position sensing in applications such as offshore oil platforms, lock and dam gates, ships and vessels, pin-placement detection, wastewater rendering areas, bilge level, high-pressure washdown, draw bridges, and subsea valve position monitoring.
  • High-Pressure. Options up to 960 bar (10,000 psi). Typical application includes hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders.

For more information, CLICK HERE.

218

3:16 pm
March 13, 2017
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‘Lean’ Your Way To Workplace Efficiency

03175srandmThe 5S process has proven to be a highly effective organizational tool for modern, Lean work environments. Are your operation’s plant-floor personnel taking full advantage of this methodology?

According to experts in storage, organization, and material-handling solutions at Akron, OH-based Akro-Mils (akro-mils.com), organizations that invest in a 5S process increase productivity, create higher-quality products, and lower operating costs through simple waste removal, visual identification, and efficient use of space. By incorporating a 5S Lean methodology, they note, facilities can:

• improve workflow and productivity
• develop a cleaner, more efficient environment
• create extra workspace
• increase safety
• reduce wasted time and effort
• boost worker morale
• ensure improvements remain intact.

A recent Akro-Mils blog post provided the following refresher on steps in the 5S process, along with some ways this Lean approach can lead to improved workplace efficiency.

— Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

randm1. Sort.

The first step in the 5S Lean methodology is eliminating items that are not needed for the current workflow. This step is crucial to reducing clutter, eliminating outdated or expired materials and supplies, and freeing up valuable real estate in your workspace. A key decision point in this step is determining which items stay and which items go. Unnecessary items are moved out of the workspace and either immediately disposed of or stored offsite and dealt with later.

2. Set in Order.

Frequently used workstation materials and tools should be arranged so that all needed items are readily accessible and easy to find. In this step, the workspace is reorganized and redefined for the most efficient use of space. All tools and supplies are labeled and organized, and a system is implemented to make sure they are always returned to their proper locations.

3. Shine.

When first implementing a 5S Lean process, all work areas receive a thorough cleaning and inspection. A formal cleaning and maintenance schedule is then developed to prevent dirt from accumulating and keep equipment in proper working condition.

4. Standardize.

Benchmarking and evaluation tactics should be used in your 5S Lean process to maintain a consistent approach for carrying out tasks and procedures. For example, standardizing the storage of supplies through color-coding is an effective way to provide helpful, easily recognizable visual indicators throughout an entire facility.

5. Sustain.

The last step is to continue maintaining efficient workflow and productivity with your 5S Lean system. The best way to do that is through education and empowerment of those using the system. Communicating the benefits of an ongoing 5S process will help ensure personnel’s continued adherence to it and, just as important, that there is no falling back into bad habits. Equipping workers with a well-designed 5S checklist does more than merely support the following of those procedures. It’s an effective way to create accountability and keep this valuable process going strong. MT

For more information on 5S and other workplace topics, and to download a copy of the Akro-Mils 5S Procedure Checklist, visit akro-mils.com.

581

2:58 pm
March 13, 2017
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Keep Stored Gear Reducers Service Ready

When gear reducers and other capital spares are improperly prepared for storage, their service readiness can be seriously compromised.

When gear reducers and other capital spares are improperly prepared for storage, their service readiness can be seriously compromised.

Are your statically stored gear reducers service ready? That’s the first of several questions from Dillon Gully of Motion Industries (headquartered in Birmingham, AL, motionindustries.com). He has good reason for asking. In conducting borescope inspections of statically stored internal-gear reducers for customers, Motion Industries personnel discovered as many as one-third of these assets sitting on shelves in a failed state.

Next questions: Are you willing to gamble the OEE (overall equipment effectiveness) and profitability of your facility on gear reducers and, for that matter, other capital spares that might not be service ready? What would you tell your boss if a critical spare were to fail within mere hours? Think this scenario doesn’t apply to you? How can you be sure? Gully offers some advice for achieving peace of mind.

— Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

Effective management of capital spares involves up-front identification of these assets and making sure they are in service-ready condition prior to preparing them for long-term storage. Unfortunately, many operations don’t follow through on this process once purchased units arrive on site. According to Gully, these steps are the only way to support the reliability of stored spares.

Capital spares can be defined as any item that is critical to production, promotes safety, decreases downtime, and/or prevents environmental issues. Gear reducers certainly qualify. The best way of verifying that these assets won’t fail as soon as they’re put into service is to inspect them before they are stored away—perhaps for years. Minimally invasive borescope inspections are a particularly good inspection method.

In a borescope inspection of a gear reducer, a camera scope visually inspects the condition of bearings, gearing, and internal components. The procedure can be accomplished through a plughole, which prevents contamination of an asset, if it is, indeed, ready for service. (Compared to the cost of replacing a failed bearing, costs associated with borescope inspections are also minimal.)

randmStorage planning

While information gleaned from borescope inspections can be used to confirm service readiness—or help identify steps for making a spare service ready—it can also help determine how to prevent these units from improper storage.

Corrosion, i.e., rust and contamination, are two, of many, causes of failure in gear reducers. When borescope inspections identify the presence of these failure modes, steps can be taken to correct them before the equipment is put into storage, as well as prevent those problems from recurring during storage.

Once a plan to prevent failures in stored spares is developed and implemented, it should be consistently followed. Every unit that will be stored, for whatever period of time, should be carefully protected. Preventing rust and contamination is a great start in protecting asset reliability and, thus, ensuring service readiness.

An ongoing process

Keeping stored spares in service-ready condition requires management accountability. Someone must be assigned responsibility for these assets, and expectations should be clear and realistic. It’s the responsibility of that designated person to ensure all spares are properly prepared and maintained. Identifying failed spares and bringing them back to service-ready condition is an ongoing process. As Dillon Gully emphasizes, “It should not be done one time and then forgotten.”

This plan for reliability can lower the probability of failure and bring a welcome degree of certainty regarding your stored gear reducers and other capital spares. MT

Working as an analyst for Motion Industries’ service center in Pensacola, FL, Dillon Gully has been conducting vibration and borescope inspections and managing capital spares for three years. For more information on these topics, visit motionindustries.com or bearings.com.

91

2:53 pm
March 13, 2017
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Mine Business Intelligence From Your CMMS

Car BoomBusiness Intelligence (BI) analysis is crucial to an operation’s success. In short, this analysis is the harnessing of software to mine an organization’s raw data. Analyzing that data through the use of reporting and analytics can support critical business decisions.

In the maintenance world, a computerized maintenance management software (CMMS) system plays a vital role in collecting useful data. Technical experts at Mapcon Technologies Inc. (Johnston, IA, mapcon.com) point to five areas where these systems can help your organization analyze and understand its valuable business intelligence and put it to use.

— Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

Inventory auditing

It’s important for maintenance personnel to know how many parts are needed and when they need to be reordered. By running an inventory usage report within a CMMS, users can find out exactly how many individual parts were used over a specific period of time. Once that information is gathered, a minimum number, or reorder point, of parts can be established to trigger an automatic reorder that, in turn, would be approved and sent to the vendor. This can ensure that stock-outs are no longer a problem and, accordingly, prevent downtime.

randmPredictive analysis

For maintenance departments, being able to predict when equipment will fail is a big deal. A CMMS can determine, based on meter or gauge readings and historical data, when a machine is most likely to break down. Take, for example, a machine that breaks a belt approximately every 1,000 hr. Since a CMMS would display that trend, a technician could set up a preventive–maintenance (PM) task to change the belt every 950 hr. By using a CMMS to predict when the machine will break a belt, downtime can be avoided.

Preventive-maintenance compliance

Since PM information is stored within a CMMS, it is easy to analyze. When reviewing such data, managers can break it down by type of work done, employee, area, or other metrics, and make necessary changes. For example, by determining why certain PMs weren’t completed on time, they could take steps to hire new workers or provide additional training to current employees.

Failure analysis

A CMMS stores an extensive amount of historical data, including repairs, for each piece of equipment in a plant. Therefore, when personnel notice that machines have required numerous repairs, they can analyze stored failure codes to help determine root causes. They can also review CMMS information on when repairs were done, associated downtime, and PM activities, among other things, to devise corrective measures. Say a technician discovers that a machine breaks more belts in the winter due to colder temperatures. With this information, he or she could plan ahead and turn up the heat in the area or order more belts to have on hand during winter months.

HR (human resource) reporting

Reports within a CMMS can be run for things other than maintenance-repair information. Many software programs can run HR-related reports, i.e., an open work order by craft or shift report. This capability allows managers to view the workload according to shift or craft, something that can be beneficial when it comes to hiring decisions. MT

For more information from Mapcon Technologies on this and other CMMS topics, visit mapcon.com.

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