Archive | Lubrication Management & Technology

30

9:00 am
July 15, 2016
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Battery-Driven Grease Gun

1607mtprod20pTLGB 20 battery-driven grease gun has an integrated grease meter to dispense the proper amount of lubricant for an application. A rechargeable 20-V lithium battery delivers extended service life. A built-in light illuminates the work area. The gun dispenses as many as 15 grease cartridges/battery charge and has two flow rates adjustable for specific application. Pressures to 10,000 psi can be achieved.

SKF USA Inc.
Lansdale, PA
skfusa.com

142

4:05 pm
July 11, 2016
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Use These Steps to Introduce New Lubes

Part of of the process equipment of the mechanism close-up.

The process of introducing new lubricants to your plant calls for great care, communication, and attention to details.

By Ken Bannister, MEch Eng (UK), CMRP, MLE, Contributing Editor

New lubricants are introduced into plant environments every day. There can be several reasons behind this type of move: a purchase-cost-reduction or purchase-bid program; new equipment for which the manufacturer’s specified lubricant isn’t currently stocked on site; promotion of a specialty lubricant as a way to solve a specific equipment problem; or some form of lubrication-management initiative. Unfortunately, most new lubricants are introduced in an informal, non-controlled manner with little or no communication between the reliability/maintenance, engineering and/or purchasing departments—or much consideration of the impact that the new product can, and will, have on the maintenance and operation of the physical plant.

With no structured lubrication program in place, the mixing of lubricants—greases and oils—can be endemic. This situation is a major cause of lubricant and premature bearing failure due to the cross contamination of base oils and/or additive packages. For example, a product containing acidic additives added to one containing base or alkaline additives can very quickly neutralize a lubricant’s effectiveness and protection ability, often resulting in catastrophic failure. Anyone who has toiled over implementing a lubrication-management program knows that allowing a new lubricant into a plant environment must be formalized and controlled. This process is not necessarily easy.

An essential part of any quality lubrication-management program is an initial consolidation process that reviews and documents all current lubricant products on site, where they are used, and how they are stored, handled, transferred, and delivered to minimize contamination of lubricants and bearings. This essential engineering process, performed by the lubricant manufacturer, looks for opportunities where more modern, often less expensive, products can be standardized for use across the site to replace all redundant, unsafe, and out-of-date oils and greases, and minimize the number required to operate the plant safely and effectively. In many facilities, the number of lubricants stocked and used after consolidation can be less than half the original count. For this standardization to begin, the consolidation process must determine all possible lubricant compatibility issues and propose suitable engineered lubricant change-out/flushing operating procedures.

Once a list of new lubricants is finalized, the plant must take the following steps to formalize the program:

  1. Prepare a formal approved-lubricant list for purchasing-department personnel and set up a blanket purchase-order for the approved products.
  2. Inform all affected stakeholders of the impending change(s) to an approved-lubricant list.
  3. Remove all non-approved lubricant stock from the plant.
  4. Develop a stock rotation/control procedure for all approved lubricants.
  5. Obtain up-to-date MSDS sheets for all approved lubricants and remove all non-approved MSDS sheets.
  6. Purchase dedicated (color-coded) storage and transfer equipment for all approved lubricants.
  7. Purchase labels for all approved lubricant reservoirs.
  8. Change all lubrication filters.
  9. Develop a lubricant change-out flushing procedure and systematically change out all non-approved lubricants in all machine reservoirs; re-label reservoirs.   
  10. Update lubricant-inventory-control software with lube specification, supplier, manufacturer, code numbers, min/max levels, and inventory-turn rate.
  11. Update affected preventive-maintenance (PM) job tasks in the CMMS (computerized maintenance-management system) to reflect new lubricant changes.
  12. Update any recommended changes to PM schedules in the CMMS.
  13. Update equipment manuals to reflect new lubricant changes.
  14. Update Bill of Materials (BOMs) in the CMMS.
  15. Update changes to the lubricant disposal procedure.
  16. Update any changes to reporting requirements in the CMMS.
  17. Perform staff training for change awareness, product handling and safety issues, and product disposal.
  18. Inform production.
  19. Develop a new-lubricant trial/approval procedure for any non-approved oil or grease introduced into the plant.

After a consolidation program has been implemented, only approved lubricants can be brought into the plant for regular use. This policy, however, does not exclude introduction of a new lubricant into the plant on a trial basis. Should a new lubricant trial be required, a formal request must be made to the reliability/maintenance group by completing a “Lubricant Trial Request Form.” That group, in turn, will oversee the lubricant trial.

Typical trial-request-form attributes

A good trial-request form should have enough relevant information to enable the trial to take place and collect enough relevant data from which a yes/no approval decision can be made upon the trial’s completion. The form must elicit answers to all of the W5 questions—Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How—and document the test results. (This translates to seven sections total.)

  1. Who? Contains the name, title, department, and contact details of the trial requestor, as well as details of the lubricant supplier and manufacturer name and primary contact persons. It also provides the person(s), title(s), and department performing the trial.
  2. What? Contains the trial lubricant specification data that will include its name, oil or grease, base-oil type, viscosity, VI (viscosity index) rating, additives, virgin-oil sample datasheet #/attachment, MSDS sheet, expected compatibility issues with other approved products, seals, and production raw materials.
  3. When? Contains the expected trial duration, along with commencement and completion dates.
  4. Where? Contains equipment type or specific
    equipment number of the machine on which the lubricant is to be tested.
  5. Why? Details reasons for the lubricant trial, in what way it will benefit the trial equipment and expected results, such as temperature reduction, energy reduction, life-increase expectation of lubricant and/or bearing surfaces and sustainability, and what bearing-failure reduction the trial is expected to accomplish.
  6. How? Documents the actual test procedure specifics, including lubricant disposal after the test and the conditions to be tested, i.e., amperage draw, temperature of bearings/lubricant, and lubrication-system pressure (cold and hot running).
  7. Results? Details findings data and conclusions relevant to the test, including before and after data readings, photos, infrared images, vibration readings, risk/benefit analysis, a return-on-investment statement, and a recommendation for approving or not approving the lubricant for purchase and use in the plant.

Be sure to alert plant personnel whenever a lubricant trial is being performed. Communicate this fact by placing a placard or sign on the equipment that states “Machine Under Test with New [insert name] Lubricant.” (Specifically call out the name of the lubricant). Make operators aware of such tests and notify maintenance personnel of anything unusual regarding noise, vibration, smell, and leakage during the procedure.

Before proceeding with any lubricant trial, always consult with manufacturer(s) of your approved lubricants to establish:

  • whether they have already performed a compatibility test of the trial product with your approved lubricants.
  • if, as suppliers of your approved lubricant, they have a comparable product available to test, or that you may already stock. You should also contact trial-lubricant manufacturer personnel and ask if they have conducted any compatibility tests with your approved lubricants. If no testing has taken place, you can ask if any party is willing to test compatibility on your behalf.
  • In the case of new oils, when no compatibility information is available or forthcoming—and you are unable to establish compatibility—you can perform your own testing, as follows:
  • Take samples of both lubricants and blend three mixed samples in ratios of 50:50, 90:10, and 10:90.
  • Send the three mixed samples to an oil-analysis laboratory and have them tested for filterability, sediment, and color/clarity. Also ask the lab to perform an RPVOT (rotating pressure-vessel oxidization test) to determine the new lubricant’s resistance to oxidation, and a storage-stability comparison.
  • For accurate results, tests should be performed three times and the results normalized.
  • Ask the lab to assist you in determining any cross-contamination risk.
  • Share the test results with the manufacturer of the new lubricant and ask for a change-out/flush procedure.

Note that an RPVOT can be quite expensive to perform. Thus, in the case of non-critical equipment, and if you won’t need to complete a large number of lubricant changeovers, you could forego the RPVOT and simply ask the manufacturer of a new lubricant to recommend a neutral flushing oil.

In the case of new greases, similar steps are followed. The process starts by blending mixed samples of new and existing greases in 75:25 and 25:75 ratios, and sending them to an oil-analysis lab to test for consistency, dropping point, and shear stability.

If a new-lubricant trial is deemed successful, and none of your existing approved lubricants can perform the required job, the new product can be accepted as an “approved” lubricant. The acceptance process, however, calls for the reliability/maintenance group to once again go through the appropriate steps listed above to formally integrate the new lubricant into your plant. MT

Ken Bannister is managing partner and principal consultant for EngTech Industries Inc., (Innerkip, Ontario, Canada), an asset management-consulting firm now specializing in the implementation of certifiable ISO 55001 lubrication-management programs and asset-management systems. For further details, telephone (519) 469-9173, or email kbannister@engtechindustries.com.

70

8:03 pm
July 7, 2016
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Industrial Growth Partners Acquires Des-Case Parent

Screen Shot 2016-07-07 at 2.15.47 PMIndustrial Growth Partners (IGP), a San Francisco-based private equity firm, has acquired the parent company of  lubricant-contamination-control leader Des-Case Corp. (Goodlettesville, TN).

With a 20-yr. history in the industrial sector, and $2.2 billion in capital raised since inception, IGP has extensive experience building global manufacturing businesses. According to the company, it concentrates  on leading niche manufacturers of engineered products used in critical applications, and partners with their management teams to pursue strategic initiatives focused on achieving long-term shareholder value.

Screen Shot 2016-07-07 at 2.19.40 PMFounded in 1983 when it brought the first desiccant breather to market, Des-Case now provides an array of  fluid-cleanliness products, services, and training that improve equipment reliability and extend lubricant life in industrial plants around the globe. It, in fact, has enjoyed the growth-opportunity benefits of private-equity investments since 2013, when it was acquired by Pfingsten Partners L.L.C.

Screen Shot 2016-07-07 at 2.20.35 PMIn 2014, Des-Case announced its own acquisition of the visual-oil-analysis line of ESCO Products Inc., the well-known, family-owned, Houston-based manufacturer of various  fluid-monitoring technologies and distributor of Copaltite and Dow Corning products. The acquired portfolio included ESCO’s 3-D BullsEye Viewport, oil sight glasses, indicators and level monitors.

“I am honored and excited to be a part of writing the next chapter in the Des-Case growth story alongside our valued customers, partners and investors,” noted company president and CEO Brian Gleason. “IGP has over two decades of experience investing in the industrial sector with a proven track record of building world-class global businesses. We are looking forward to the partnership.”

Other than the report that Des-Case’s management team has retained a substantial ownership stake in the company, terms of the July 6, 2016 transaction haven’t been disclosed.

For more information on Des-Case, CLICK HERE.

To learn more about Industrial Growth Partners, CLICK HERE.

29

9:00 am
July 7, 2016
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Lithium Grease

CorrLube VpCI EP grease is lithium complex grease formulated with premium quality, severely hydro treated base stock. Said to provide excellent resistance to oxidation and with high temperature stability, it is suitable for operating and lay-up conditions. The formula is designed with properties that protect against salt water, brine, H2S, HC1, and other corrosive agents. It also incorporates Vapor phase Corrosion Inhibitors (VpCI) for areas not in direct contact with the grease. The grease remains effective in extreme operating conditions such as high temperature, high pressure, and shock loading, and aids in the suspension of solid additives such as graphite, molybdenum, and disulfide. Thicker film consistency allows it to operate on worn parts.
Cortec Corp.
St. Paul, MN
cortecvci.com

12

9:00 am
June 28, 2016
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Net-Oil Measurement

Foxboro NOCT60A net-oil Coriolis transmitter is an all-in-one meter and flow computer that provides a single-box solution for net-oil measurement applications. Consisting of a CFT51 Coriolis transmitter and a CFS10, CFS20, or CFS25 mass flow tube, the unit integrates digital technology with a built-in flow computer equipped with Realflo software to measure net-oil volumes on the liquid leg of two-phase separators or the oil leg of three-phase separators. The transmitter is said to solve common problems associated with the measurement of production fluids, including incomplete separation and gas carry-under, and of detecting adverse conditions such as fluid erosion, corrosion, and flowtube coating.
Schneider Electric
Foxboro, MA
schneider-electric.com

351

9:57 pm
June 13, 2016
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Six Lubrication Myths Debunked

When it comes to machinery health, some lubrication myths are downright dangerous.

When it comes to machinery health, some lubrication myths are downright dangerous.

Despite years of concerted efforts by industry experts and suppliers, some dangerous lubrication myths continue to swirl around many maintenance operations. Motion Industries lubrication specialist Chris Kniestedt takes a down-and-dirty approach to debunk six of them.

Myth 1: All lubricating oils are the same.

From hydraulic fluids to gear lubricants to motor oils, each lubricant, be it synthetic or mineral-based, is uniquely formulated for its application with a specific viscosity; additive package; physical, chemical, and performance properties; and regulatory requirements. Various products may or may not be compatible with each other (see Myth 6).

Myth 2: If a little is good, more is better.

Take grease, for example. Over-greased bearings are a major cause of equipment failure. Blown seals and overheating are just two negative results of using too much grease. A general rule of thumb for normal- or high-speed machinery is that it’s better to err on the side of caution and to always check the OEM’s recommendations.

Overfilling gearboxes will also lead to problems, including failed shaft seals or increased operating temperatures. A gearbox that has too much oil will have to work harder to move through the lubricant, subsequently generating more heat or churning the oil into foam.

Myth 3: Blue, red, or black grease is better than white or clear grease.

Color is not a key factor in selecting grease for an application. There’s no standard for doing so. Instead, pay attention to base-oil viscosity (based on speed, load, and expected operating temperature), thickener type to mitigate incompatibility issues and consistency, and/or how well a product will pump at operating temperatures.

Myth 4: Tacky and stringy greases and oils offer better protection than non-tacky products.

It’s important to understand that lubricants are only 10- to 20-microns thick at the point of contact. Moreover, film thickness is a function of base-oil viscosity at operating temperature and speed (to a lesser degree, load). Thus, always use caution when applying tacky lubricants or greases with higher percentages of thickener at high operating speeds.

Myth 5: Food Grade (NSF H-1) products are never as good as Non-Food Grade (NSF H-2) products.

Advances in base-oil technology and additive chemistry have made Food Grade H1 products stronger than ever, particularly with synthetics. There are many applications where a correct, strong Food Grade H1 product will work as well as a non-Food Grade H2 mineral-oil-based equivalent.

Myth 6: All products are compatible.

Consider greases. In addition to their base oils and additive packages, greases are formulated with various thickeners (lithium, lithium complex, aluminum complex, calcium, polyurea, bentone, and silica gel), which aren’t necessarily compatible with each other. Always exercise caution when changing greases. Laboratory compatibility testing will clear up any doubts. If incompatibility exists between old and new products, purge bearings before changing to the new one. Oils aren’t always compatible either, especially with the new generation of synthetics. Finally, mixing Food Grade H1 lubricants with Non-Food Grade H2 will create contamination issues, which will cause you to lose H1 designation. MT

Chris Kniestedt is lubrication specialist for the San Francisco Division of Birmingham, AL-based Motion Industries. For more information visit www.motionindustries.com.

310

5:03 pm
June 13, 2016
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The Color of Lubrication

Add visual management to your lube-program toolbox through an array of color-coded solutions.

By Ken Bannister, MEch Eng (UK), CMRP, MLE, Contributing Editor

When you hear the word lubrication, what color comes to mind? If you answer brown, or allude to some shade of it, you’re in good company. More than 80% of maintainers to whom I’ve posed this question over the past 30 years have responded the same way.

The reality is that oil and grease products come in a rainbow of colors and shades, including white, gray, black, silver, blue, green, red, purple, and every variation of brown, from golden honey to dark, earth tones. Manufacturers typically color these products for their own purposes. Unfortunately, there’s no formal industry standard or convention regarding their choices, with the exception that most food-grade greases tend to be white.

Most lubricant colors are naturally influenced by the color of the crude base-oil stock and its additive package. For example, when molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is added in any quantity, it can significantly darken the lubricant to near black in color. Manufacturers, though, add colorants to their respective lubricants to help identify different brands and/or make products more appealing and marketable to the end user.

Despite incongruent colorization, maintenance departments can take advantage of differences in lubricant colors in their plants. For example, if two or more grease brands or different colors are employed in a facility, personnel can be made aware of which color belongs to what bearing by a photo of that grease color posted on the machine or close to the grease nipple. If a trace amount of the previously used grease is evident at the bearing or grease nipple, maintainers would (should be made to) understand that they are not to pump a grease of a different color or shade on top of the original grease.

Oil colors are a different matter. Oil ages in service and its additive package will deplete through contamination, heat, and oxidation. This causes a natural darkening in color. That visual cue has been used for many years in industry and the automotive world to manage oil changes. Sadly, this somewhat risky strategy can fall flat when an oil is changed out with one of a different color and additive composition—especially in the case of darker oils.

Introducing color coding

In 1950, the prestigious UK Scientific Lubrication Journal published an article by M.J. Harrison titled “Color Codes.” In it, Harrison, who at the time was an engineer in the technical department of the UK’s C.C. Wakefield & Co. (now known as Castrol), detailed a symbol/color-control system methodology for identifying the lubricants used in an industrial plant. As he pointed out, employing symbols to denote frequency of application and colors to signify lubricant type would ensure that unskilled workers were able to perform “factory lubrication” in a consistent manner, with scientific precision.

Harrison went on to recommend the use of different 1-in.-high geometric symbols painted on lubricant reservoirs or at lube points to represent lubrication-interval schedules. He proposed a circle to represent the need for daily lubrication, a triangle for weekly lubrication, and a square to represent monthly intervals between lubrication activities. For activities conducted on a quarterly basis (or over longer periods), the square was to again be used, but this time with a number painted inside the square to highlight the number of interval months.

To determine the correct lubricant to apply, each symbol was to be painted one of three primary colors: yellow, red, or blue to correspond with an already-determined lubricant legend. If more than three lubricants were to be used, the same colors were used again, but with the addition of a bold black diagonal stripe across the symbol.

But Harrison didn’t stop with the design and color of symbols and shapes to help identify different lubricant and application intervals in a facility. He also advocated color-coding reservoirs and dedicated transfer equipment to eliminate cross-contamination problems.

Which colors to use

Screen Shot 2016-06-13 at 2.46.48 PM

Color identification is an ideal means of ensuring that the right lubricant ends up in the right place, at the right time. The actual colors themselves are not as important as their consistent use, i.e., assigning a specific color to a single lubricant and all dedicated equipment employed in its use, storage, and transfer within the plant environment, as depicted in Fig. 1.

Fig. 2. This yellow-color-coded, transfer container is from OilSafe, Rockwall, TX (oilsafe.com).

Fig. 2. This yellow-color-coded, transfer container is from OilSafe, Rockwall, TX (oilsafe.com).

Harrison initially promoted the three primary colors of red, blue, and yellow for his system. In modern plant environments, however, we’re comfortable using primary and secondary color palettes, including green, orange, and purple. This is clearly evidenced by the breadth of today’s commercially available, color-coded lubrication-handling systems, including the example transfer products shown in Figs. 2 and 3.

Fig. 3. Shown is an orange-color-coded, clear-body, pistol-grip grease gun from OilSafe, Rockwall, TX (oilsafe.com).

Fig. 3. Shown is an orange-color-coded, clear-body, pistol-grip grease gun from OilSafe, Rockwall, TX (oilsafe.com).

Lubricant storage and transfer systems, though, reflect just one area where colorization pays off for a site. Another important use of color identification involves a condition-based approach to filling oil reservoirs.

Fig. 4. Color-coding is used on this condition-based Hi–Lo lubricant-reservoir-fill application. (courtesy EngTech Industries Inc.)

Fig. 4. Color-coding is used on this condition-based Hi–Lo lubricant-reservoir-fill application. (courtesy EngTech Industries Inc.)

Figure 4 is a good example of this Hi-Lo technique. It involves using red, amber (yellow), and green lines taped on the side of an automated-lubrication-system reservoir. This arrangement is known as a RAG (red/amber/green), or the traffic-light indicator system:

  • The green line indicates the upper fill level.
  • The amber (yellow) line indicates a level at which the operator is to contact the maintenance department with a first request to fill the reservoir.
  • The red line alerts the operator to call in a priority request to fill the reservoir.

Coloring your efforts

Today, you’ll find an array of color-coded tags and transfer equipment in the marketplace. These types of innovative solutions are relatively inexpensive to purchase and implement—and highly effective when used consistently. The question is, “Just how colorful are your lubrication efforts?”  MT

Ken Bannister is managing partner and principal consultant for EngTech Industries Inc., (Innerkip, Ontario, Canada), an asset management-consulting firm now specializing in the implementation of certifiable ISO 55001 lubrication-management programs and asset-management systems. For further details, telephone (519) 469-9173, or email kbannister@engtechindustries.com.

learnmore2— Industrial Lubrication Fundamentals: Storage & Handling

— Handling, Storing and Dispensing Industrial Lubricants

Key Factors in A World-Class Lubrication Program

The Five Rights of Lubrication

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