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5:27 pm
August 24, 2016
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AVO Opens Cable U, Expands Testing & Diagnostics Course Lineup

Cable 2 SMAVO Training Institute (AVO) has announced the opening of AVO Cable U at its main training location in Dallas. The facility is said to offer a hands-on, technologically advanced, real-world training venue “for every electrical cable testing and diagnostic application.”

According to AVO, with the host of critical issues facing the utility and industrial cable industry, it’s important to leverage training and test-equipment technology to improve existing and future cable installations alike. The company says that’s what its Cable U field lab and enhanced course lineup are designed for: to provide a comprehensive approach to “future proofing” cable systems for increased reliability and reduced costs.

_DSC6331 smAVO Cable U Courses and Certifications
Cable U offers training in three critical areas of the “future proofing” process for new and service-aged power cables: Cable Splicing & Terminating, Cable Fault Location & Tracing, and Cable Testing & Diagnostics.

Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 12.06.46 PMAVO Training Institute offers its Cable Technician Certification through successful completion of AVO Cable U’s Cable Splicing & Terminating, Medium-Voltage, and Cable Fault Location & Tracing, Medium-Voltage courses, as well as a new certification in Cable Testing & Diagnostics. The company notes that this offering is consistent with current industry needs to provide technicians with the capabilities to “future proof” existing and future medium-voltage installations.

To learn more and/or make arrangements to attend an open house at the Cable U training facility on October 4, 2016, CLICK HERE.

About AVO Training Institute
Dallas-based AVO, a subsidiary of Megger, is celebrating more than 50 years of keeping people safe from electrical hazards. Known for its hands-on approach and wide range of training-related deliverables, from equipment application and maintenance procedures to safe work practices, online courses, arc flash studies, and engineering services, AVO characterizes itself as “a one-stop electrical-safety learning center.” Courses are available at campuses nationwide or on-site.

37

12:21 am
August 24, 2016
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Use Fluke 368 FC & 369 FC Leakage Current Clamp Meters without Shutting Down Critical Equipment

Screen Shot 2016-08-23 at 6.56.55 PMAccording to Fluke Corp. (Everett, WA), its rugged 368 FC and 369 FC Leakage Current Clamps help electricians and maintenance technicians identify, document, record, and compare leakage current readings over time to help prevent problems before they happen. And personnel can do all this without shutting down critical equipment.

These recently released devices incorporate large-diameter jaws (40 mm for the 368 FC; 61 mm for the 369 FC) for working with oversize conductors. The clamp jaws are fully shielded and designed to accurately capture very small leakage current signals (as low as 10 μA) and minimize external electromagnetic interference. As true-rms meters, they’re designed to accurately measure complex signals, with the highest resolution of 1 µA and an upper measurement range of 60 amps.

CAT III 600 V safety rated, both models offer a forward-facing LED worklight for use in dark wiring cabinets, a backlit display with auto-off, and auto-power-off for extended battery life.

Screen Shot 2016-08-23 at 7.11.01 PMThe 368 FC and 369 FC are part of Fluke Connect, a system of more than 40 wireless test tools that communicate through the Fluke Connect app, or Fluke Connect Assets software, a cloud-based solution that gathers measurements to provide a comprehensive view of critical equipment status.

Fluke Connect lets technicians record and share both thermal images and electrical measurements in real time via their smartphones or tablets and automatically upload them to the cloud. Reports can be created and shared right from the job site by email. Personnel can also collaborate in real time with other colleagues through ShareLive video calls, thus increasing productivity in the field.

For more information on Fluke’s 368 FC and 369 FC Leakage Current Clamp Meters, CLICK HERE.

67

11:31 pm
August 23, 2016
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Snap-On Industrial Introduces Feature-Rich Williams Wireless Borescope

Screen Shot 2016-08-23 at 5.43.51 PMThe Williams Wireless Borescope (JHW40282) from Snap-on Industrial (Kenosha, WI) lets technicians quickly and easily examine engines and other machinery inside and out.According to the company,  the product offers flexibility in a number of way, including wireless connectivity that allows straightforward transmission of both still and video images.

This lightweight, handheld device features a waterproof camera (IP67 standard); a detachable 3.5-in. thin-film transistor LCD monitor that runs on a built-in rechargeable Lithium battery; and a flexible 3/8-in. (3mm) X 3-ft. (1m) lens tube. A lens-mounted LED light provides adjustable brightness, while 3x zoom capability offers increased visibility.

Supporting up to a 32GB micro SD card, the Williams Wireless Borescope comes with an accessory kit (hook, magnet, mirror, and rubber ring), power adaptor, USB and AV output cables, and carrying case.

For more information, CLICK HERE.

52

3:36 pm
August 17, 2016
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Video | Operations and Maintenance Budget Isn’t Increasing, Sound Familiar?

Let me know if you have heard something like this: “Our key challenge is transmission assets at AEP that are growing pretty rapidly…and the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget isn’t. So, you have to figure out how to stretch those maintenance dollars over more and more assets.” This comes from Jeff Fleeman,

This item comes from Jeff Fleeman, vp at BOLD Transmission LLC at the 2016 ARC Advisory event, where he provided details about their move to a predictive maintenance approach. BOLD Transmission is a subsidiary of AEP, a power provider with numerous transmission assets in the U.S. — 3,500 substations.

See his presentation here:

Fleeman discusses the distributed nature of the power business, the changing dynamics, aging assets and how “better criteria is needed to replace these assets” to regulators.

The presentation is a great look at a business that always viewed condition-based monitoring and predictive monitoring as the next move and now they’re moving forward.

1601Iot_logo>> For more IIoT coverage in maintenance and operations, click here! 

56

4:36 pm
August 11, 2016
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AutomationDirect Expands RHINO Power-Supply Portfolio

Screen Shot 2016-08-11 at 11.17.22 AMAutomationDirect (Cumming, GA), has expanded its RHINO PSB series of DIN rail power supplies with a PSB48-480S single-phase-input, 48VDC- output unit. According to the company, this high-quality, 480W solution offers high performance and reliability at a lower-cost than fuller-featured power supplies.

This model features removable finger-safe terminal blocks, output voltage status LED indicator, conformal coated circuit boards, and approval for Class 1, Division 2 hazardous locations. An aluminum housing easily installs with integral 35mm DIN rail mounting adapters. The PSB48-480S also offers overload, over-voltage, and thermal protection, and is UL 508 listed, UL 60950 recognized, CSA certified, CE marked, and RoHS compliant.

To view AutomationDirect’s entire line of power supplies, CLICK HERE.

 

 

67

3:52 pm
August 11, 2016
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Opto 22 Delivers Node-RED IIoT Solution for Industrial PACs

SNAP PAC_Node-RED_printTemecula, CA-based Opto 22 has announced immediate availability of Node-RED nodes for its industrial programmable automation controllers (PACs). According to the company, these nodes significantly decrease time and complexity in deployment of IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things) applications.

Specifically, Node-RED nodes for Opto 22’s SNAP PAC programmable automation controllers are said to “enable nearly anyone” to rapidly prototype and develop IIoT applications by opening a path to quickly connect legacy assets to cloud services.

To download Node-Red nodes along with a RESTful API for Opto 22 SNAP PAC R-series and S-series controllers, CLICK HERE.

About Node-RED
Node-RED is an innovative visual wiring tool to connect edge computing systems such as industrial automation controllers to various cloud services, including Amazon Web Services (AWS) IoT, IBM Watson IoT, and Microsoft Azure in new and interesting ways.

This open-source, cross-platform technology is currently available through GitHub.com and npmjs.org for a variety of platforms, including OS X, Microsoft Windows, Linux, and Raspberry Pi, and cloud offerings like IBM Bluemix and AT&T Flow.

Built on the popular Node.js JavaScript runtime, Node-RED benefits from a large Node-RED library—w over 500 prebuilt and ready-to-deploy nodes—allowing IIoT application developers to leverage existing software code and deploy it directly into their applications.

 

 

 

229

2:30 pm
August 10, 2016
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Who Cares About Compressed Air?

gun for compressed airBy Ron Marshall, For the Compressed Air Challenge

Compressed air is one of the most expensive sources of energy in an industrial facility. Consider the amount of energy that goes into air compressors, compared with the actual useful work returned at the compressed-air tool or machine.

Training courses on the fundamentals of compressed air include details on the high cost of producing this valuable resource for a point of use. Participants in such classes are usually amazed when they learn about the inefficiency of the energy transfer. The realization that compressed air isn’t free and, in fact, is quite pricey compared with other forms of energy, can mark a turning point in the attitudes of many users—and, for the health of their companies, they finally start to care.

randmHuman nature is a funny thing. If we don’t know the cost of something, it’s easy not to care about it—which results in waste. For example, people in my Canadian hometown are quite familiar with effective means for staying warm in cold weather. Yet, in the dead of winter, it’s not unusual for us to see wide-open windows in occupied apartment buildings around the community. To my eye, this is a sign of poor temperature control caused by faulty heating systems. In an attempt to keep their living spaces from becoming overheated, the residents resort to controlling the temperatures by the brute-force method of opening windows. After all, they don’t have to pay the heating bill; the building owner does. In short, it’s evidently easier for these apartment dwellers to continue wasting heat than to pick up the phone and call the building superintendent to fix a problematic thermostat.

A similar situation persists in industry when it comes to compressed air. Those of us who have spent much of our careers preaching about energy efficiency continue to see it time and again: a lack of caring from the plant floor on up. That can be changed, though. A good way to do it is to make people aware that what they are doing (or not doing) reduces their sites’ profitability, and could ultimately affect their job security.

Since compressed-air systems typically aren’t equipped with electricity meters, it’s easy for users to believe their compressed-air utility comes at no charge. This misconception leads to all types of inappropriate applications, i.e., using compressed air for cooling, mixing liquids, or cleaning dust. Proper training for all personnel is required to drive home the fact that what users are doing may be costing the plant a fortune in lost profits.

Installation of permanent power- and flow-measuring instruments on compressed-air systems is another way to make operators of this equipment aware of the actual costs. It also proves to them the positive effect of energy-efficiency measures that are implemented to save costs. Measuring, in turn, leads to effective management of a costly resource. These instruments can then be used to assist a company in setting up systems such as those described in the ISO 50001 Energy Management Standard. MT

For more information on compressed-air topics and related training through the Compressed Air Challenge (CAC), visit compressedairchallenge.org, or contact Ron Marshall directly at ronm@marshallcac.com.

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