Archive | Asset Management

39

7:05 pm
February 16, 2017
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Silicon Valley Company Joins the Predictive Maintenance Party

predictive maintenance platform

Source: Element Analytics

Silicon Valley-backed Element Analytics formally announced their industrial software analytics solution, Element Platform, to the market last month. The San Francisco-based Element Analytics is taking aim at the oil and gas, chemical, utility and mining industries while partnering with OSIsoft and Microsoft’s Partner Network.

The platform and the solution is a good fit for those industries, as those fields tend to rely on proprietary automation and equipment platforms that need optimization. Oil and gas, specifically, moved their strategy from offshore to their current installed base to find profitability and most producers are understanding the need for infrastructure improvement. From the press release, the Element Platform works with OSIsoft’s technology in moving unstructured, operational sensor data from “silos” to a cloud-based analytics platform, where asset models help predict downtime for physical equipment.

Related Content | How to Start a Predictive Maintenance Program

“Industrial operators face no shortage of data, says David Mount, Kleiner Perkins’ Green Growth Fund partner and co-founder of Element Analytics. Mounds of data exist, but getting the data to a ready state is core to making it analyzable, predictive and actionable.”

Predictive maintenance technology has been slow to be adopted due to operational and production conflicts, but recent IIoT solutions live on separate platforms. This allows for control platfom updates, like security patches to occur, while not interrupting asset management programs.

The Element platform also uses Microsoft Azure and Cortana Intelligence for the cloud-based analytics.

For more information, visit www.elementanalytics.com

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110

6:58 pm
February 10, 2017
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Obsolete Inventory? Deal with It.

randmObsolete. Everyone who has ever purchased a computer knows what that means. It describes your computer within a month or so of your purchase.

When the discussion turns to a plant’s MRO inventory, Roger Corley of Life Cycle Engineering (LCE.com) says it’s an entirely different type of conversation. That’s because some items are never used, yet continue to collect dust and take up valuable storeroom real estate. He has some tips for dealing with this obsolescence, starting with how to identify it.

Identifying obsolete MRO inventory, in Corley’s opinion, is the easy part, especially if a good set of parameters has been established. Most large storerooms, he says, apply these factors:

• items with movement (receipts or issues) in 3+years

• items that aren’t identified as critical spares

• items that aren’t on an active asset’s BOM (optional).

Up-front planning can ease your site’s identification and disposal of obsolete MRO items.

Up-front planning can ease your site’s identification and disposal of obsolete MRO items.

With these parameters in place, most inventory systems can quickly generate a list of obsolete items—something that should be done annually to make it easier to manage the following years’ lists.

According to Corley, the more difficult (politically charged) challenge associated with obsolete MRO items is their disposal. That’s why storeroom managers must be involved in a site’s budget-preparation process. For one thing, there will need to be a line item in the budget for disposal of inventory. In addition, since writing off unused inventory can be damaging to a company’s bottom line, it’s crucial to prepare (and obtain approval) for doing so ahead of time.

Another issue involves disposing of what personnel believe “belongs” to them. As Corley put it, “I’ve seen maintenance supervisors and managers dig in their heels when a storeroom manager begins removing what they think of as ‘their’ MRO items.” His advice to storeroom managers is to take great care to ensure important items that might have been left off the list of critical spares aren’t eliminated from inventory. Some front-end work on the part of storeroom managers can smooth the process. Such work includes:

• investigating the history of the proposed item considered for disposal

• grouping items into specific operating areas on site and scheduling meetings to review (tip: buy lunch to get participation)

• allowing area managers to present a case for inclusion of a critical spare and being prepared to offer solutions such as vendor-stored inventory.

Once a list is developed and agreement among stakeholders reached, the obsolete items must be removed from inventory and disposed of. Corley notes that this phase will be less painful in plants that have investment-recovery departments. Smaller operations will sometimes list the obsolete inventory on bidding sites or, in the case of metals, recover money by scrapping items.

“Either way,” he cautioned, “sites shouldn’t expect to get anywhere near what the initial investment was when the items were purchased. In the case of scrap, they’ll recover pennies on the dollar. As for companies with multiple plants, it’s important for sites to check with other locations regarding possible use of obsolete items before disposing of them.”

To Corley’s way of thinking, dealing with obsolete MRO inventory, including identifying and disposing of it, needn’t be viewed as a daunting task. “That is,” he said, “if the process is managed properly and homework is done before the items are removed.”  MT

—Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

Roger Corley is a Materials Management subject-matter expert with Life Cycle Engineering, Charleston, SC, and a certified facilitator for Maintenance Planning and Scheduling with the Life Cycle Institute. For more information, email rcorley@LCE.com and/or visit LCE.com.

15

8:43 pm
February 9, 2017
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Establish a Problem-Solving Organization

By Bob Williamson, Contributing Editor

The ISO 55000:2014 Asset Management Standard could play a major role in industry in the coming years. Keep up to date with our ongoing coverage of this Standard at maintenancetechnology.com/iso55k.

The ISO 55000:2014 Asset Management Standard could play a major role in industry in the coming years. Keep up to date with our ongoing coverage of this Standard at maintenancetechnology.com/iso55k.

Asset management, as defined in the ISO 55000:2014 Standard, spans the entire lifecycle of an asset. While this standard applies to many asset forms, from our perspective as reliability and maintenance professionals, the main emphasis relates to the physical assets of a business.

In ISO 55000, an asset is defined as “. . . an item, thing, or entity that has potential or actual value to an organization.” I’ve made the case in past columns, however, that highly skilled employees (such as maintenance technicians) should also be considered assets because they represent potential and actual value through developed and deployed skill sets.

There’s also a lifecycle element in the development of a qualified maintenance technician, beginning with aptitude and core-job competence. At some point, due to aging out, retiring, or the inability to perform specified work, technicians’ value-adding qualities fade.

That holds true for any highly skilled decision maker, including engineers, buyers, chief executives, and project managers. They all reflect potential or actual value to the organization. Thus, their lifecycle skill sets must be honed to contribute to achieving asset-management goals and, by extension, organization goals. Problem solving is one of those skill sets. In fact, it’s a primary and pervasive requirement in an asset-management system.

According to ISO 55000, “The management system elements include the organization’s structure, roles and responsibilities, planning, operation, etc.”

One of the major characteristics of an asset-management system is that it must assure the ability of the organization’s key stakeholders at various levels to identify and solve problems when an asset deviates from the normal or expected performance. Problem solving must then be a key responsibility of specific roles. In turn, a problem-solving mindset is essential within an asset-management system to identify risks that could affect the organization’s goals.

An organization’s problem-solving mindset plays a key role throughout all phases of an asset’s lifecycle.

An organization’s problem-solving mindset plays a key role throughout all phases of an asset’s lifecycle.

The lifecycle perspective

The intent of ISO 55001 is to set the requirements for a system to manage selected assets throughout their lifecycle. Asset lifecycles begin in the design stage, and progress through engineering and procurement, installation and startup, and operations and maintenance, to decommissioning and disposal.

Each phase of an asset’s lifecycle involves people in a variety of roles and responsibilities, and differing disciplines and priorities. While the phases are sequential, they must remain highly interrelated and interdependent when it comes to assuring reliable performance of the asset. Requirements of the ISO 55001 Asset Management System assure that the organization’s goals will be met. For a functioning asset-management system, there must be an organization-wide problem-solving mindset that translates to problem identification and mitigation responsibilities within each lifecycle phase of the assets.

In the earliest phases, this problem-solving mindset must deal with anticipated and potential problems and their mitigation. Later, in the installation phases, the problem-solving mindset must deal with physical-asset damage and installation errors. During the operation and maintenance phases, the problem-solving mindset must deal with proactive problem prevention. Finally, in the decommissioning phase, the problem-solving mindset must deal with asset removal and disposal hazards.

Organizing for asset management clearly requires a problem-solving mindset within the organization. Consider this mindset a fundamental skill set to be deployed in a consistent and systematic manner. MT

Contact Bob Williamson at RobertMW2@cs.com.

42

12:11 am
November 30, 2016
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Will Legacy Turbine Owners Embrace New Monitoring Platforms?

16ARCadvisoryARC Advisory Group recently released a new market research study on smart control and monitoring solutions for legacy turbines, and, surprise, there’s “low-hanging” fruit for companies. Slight kidding aside, turbines have been around for some time and so have their legacy control platforms — mostly proprietary.

The research study from ARC suggests that power plants and self-powered factories could keep their turbines but upgrade their control (and monitoring) platforms solutions to achieve better uptime. As an industry analyst recently said to me, “It’s hard to calculate an ROI for turbine projects, but a legacy control system will eventually fail and, due to missing spare parts, cause extended downtime.

Due to so many open industrial networking protocols, a new control and monitoring platform can integrate pretty easily into current turbine equipment. And, more importantly, it allows for better visibility into a turbine’s compressors and pumps, for example. The ability to monitor 18 different sensors in the combustion chamber and see it clearly on a computer screen in the control room is hugely valuable and hard to put into dollar terms.

However, many companies are starting too.

Back in September, Maintenance Technology’s IIoT section reported on Mitsubishi’s HiTec Paper mill IIoT program. The company added 26 smartcheck vibration sensors to better monitor a cooling system for its four-story coated thermo-sensitive paper system. After installing the vibration sensors at the cost of €25,500, the paper manufacturer reported a €10,500 ROI due to the avoidance of three failures, service-loss, and machine damage.

>> Related Content | Video: Quick Return on Investment for IIoT Project

Plus, Tim Shea reported in a recent blog post that this might kick-in a service component for automation suppliers:

In addition, IIoT offers opportunities to apply new kinds of business models that will promote growth. Turbine monitoring & controls suppliers may start selling energy or mechanical drive for compression services if they also offer turbines or they could partner with turbine manufacturers to offer remote monitoring and control services for a monthly or yearly fee.

The ARC market research study is for 2017 and reports a sluggish year for this market, but this could change as the political winds have shifted towards the oil and gas market (via this overview link).

We’ll see.

1601Iot_logo>> For more IIoT coverage in maintenance and operations, click here! 

114

4:17 pm
November 23, 2016
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Data Optimization Trend Continues for Oil and Gas

oil and gas platformThe oil and gas industry’s outlook for 2017 looks similar to what it was at the start of 2016,  optimize current drilling operations. In a recent press release, General Electric announced a partnership with Maersk Drilling around a marine predictive intelligence pilot project that will target drilling operations.

GE says it will “collaborate on this data-analytic pilot project with the objective to increase Maersk’s drilling vessels productivity and reduce maintenance costs by up to 20 percent.” The project will last 12 months and will use GE’s SeaStream Insight platform — via Predix — to perform “marine asset management.”

“Digital capability will be one of the key enablers for Maersk Drilling, and we embrace this industrial transition,” says Jesper Hansen, CIO, Maersk Drilling. “We are excited to collaborate with GE who is at the forefront of the digital revolution.”

>> Related Content | IIoT Journey for an Automotive Tier One Supplier

Some of the operational details include sensor data from critical equipment connected to a historian and then takes the information from it and models a “digital twin.” The modeling or the “digital twin” allows for the optimization and some predictive intelligence, according to GE. The press release also reported operational data is presented via operator dashboards, though no details on that setup were provided.

For more information, visit www.gemarinesolutions.com

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59

9:36 pm
October 18, 2016
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Webinar | Legacy Plants Embracing Data Acquisition Strategies

Three well-maintained self-primer pumps located at a water treatment plant in Ohio. Photo: Summit Pump Inc.

As the Industrial Internet of Things dialogue has evolved this year, legacy plants and better data acquisition strategies have been part of the conversation. The fear of rip-and-replace has been replaced by data acquisition actions with quick return-on-investment in some cases.

This on-demand webinar from LNS Research and Panoramic Power show what’s driving connected assets and, more importantly, how to capture legacy asset data.

>> Related Content | Case Study: Operations and Maintenance Budget Isn’t Increasing, Sound Familiar?

Below is a quick overview of the webinar:

In  a recent webinar, Panoramic Power partnered with LNS research to break down how manufacturers can utilize Asset Performance Management (APM) tools and IIoT technologies to improve products and productivity – and the best way for managers to build a case for implementation of smart enterprise control at their own facilities.

Click Here to View >>

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80

2:31 pm
September 7, 2016
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Operations and Maintenance Teams and Enabling IIoT Technology

16ARCadvisoryAdding more sensors or “things” to applications or processes begs the question: Who’s responsibility is it to analyze these data points within an enterprise? This is the IT/OT convergence debate happening in some manufacturing circles.

From a recent blog post at Paula Hollywood’s outpost at the ARC Advisory Group’s IoT site, she writes:

If engineering has primary responsibility for asset-related data, it should also be included to provide a single model of automation and operations management. In order to gain maximum benefit from convergence, enterprises must move beyond simply automating and integrating production processes to automating and integrating workflows with business processes including plant engineering in a common information infrastructure.

Asset management can be a pain point but more companies are moving towards distributed monitoring of KPIs, operation parameters and machine health. The lynchpin for distributed monitoring for operations and maintenance teams  is “light” infrastructure solutions via industrial networking in certain cases, see below:

The app and monitoring platform allow Southwest Baking to use this browser-based software from Opto 22 to build mobile monitoring interfaces and then allow production personnel to login via smartphone or tablet. The food manufacturer leans on all of its employees, both management and operators, to monitor 11,000 lbs./hr. of frozen product runs according to KPIs.

“We use it (monitoring platform) strictly [for] indicators, and it’s meant to be more than a HMI,” says Rob Wroblewski, plant engineer at Southwest Baking. “We don’t use it to actually control food processing; just for data in a useable format.”

The automation platforms and technology have converged also and solutions can be implemented to help operations and maintenance staffs immediately.

1601Iot_logo>> For more IIoT coverage in maintenance and operations, click here! 

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