Archive | CMMS

220

3:09 pm
March 13, 2017
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SAP Tips and Tricks: Maintenance Plans — What do all the fields mean?

By Kristina Gordon, DuPont

SAP Maintenance Plans determine how and when a work order or notification will be generated. (Object or notifications will be referred to as objects in this article.) The scheduling parameter settings within the maintenance plan you create dictate these rules. In response to several questions I’ve received about what should be entered and what the value represents, the following screen shot and definitions describe, in detail, the scheduling parameter settings that should be used in a typical maintenance plan. MT

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SF (shift factor) later confirmation:

Based on the percentage entered, this will dictate the next plan date, or due date, of the maintenance plan if an object confirmation has been completed after the original due date.

Example: If the due date for a plan, generated on an object, is Jan. 1, and the maintenance plan is on a 30-day scheduling frequency, however the work and confirmation of that work is not completed until Jan. 15, a 100% late SF will generate the next object on Feb. 15, 30 days after the confirmation. If the SF later confirmation is set at 0%, then the next work order will generate on the scheduling frequency of 30 days without a shift factor calculated in, meaning the work order will generate on Feb. 1.

SF earlier confirmation:

The same rules apply as above, only this formula will calculate based on early confirmation of a work order. If set at 100% and the work is performed 15 days early, the next object will be generated 15 days earlier than the original plan date. If set at 0%, the original plan date will stay the same.

randmTolerance (+):

This determines the difference between the actual completion date and the planned date.

Example: If you set a 20% tolerance on a plan that has a scheduling frequency of 30 days, the calculation the system will use is 30 days x 20% = 6 days. That means you have a 6-day “float” period that is accepted by the system and will not affect scheduling. If you complete the job and confirm the work 6 days early, the plan will not change, i.e., the dates are in the acceptable range.

Tolerance (-):

As in the above example, the parentage calculation applies and will allow a 6-day float after the plan date.

Cycle modification factor:

This calculation is used when implementing maintenance strategies. If you have a cycle duration of 60 days, but want a plan to generate in 90 days, set the cycle modification to 1.5. This will allow the plan to generate an object in 90 days while the other plans on the same strategy will generate in 60 days. The calculation used for this example is 60 days x 1.5 = 90 days.

Factory calendar:

The factory calendar dictates when the system will process scheduling. Factory calendars can be set in the header data of the maintenance plan or at the planning plant item level.

Example: If the factory calendar is set at a 5-day workweek calendar with holidays, object will not accept confirmations on non-working days (this would include weekends and holidays). You will receive a system error message “not a working day.” To avoid this, a factory calendar should be created for maintenance that allows a 7-day, 24-hour working schedule.

Call horizon:

The calculation used in this field will determine how far in advance an object is generated before the plan due date.

Example: On a 30-day plan, if the call horizon is set at 25%, the work order will generate 21 days before the plan due date of the object. It is very important to set your call horizon so that an object is generated so that the job can be planned well in advance of the plan due date.

Scheduling period:

The scheduling period indicates, in days, months, or years, how far in advance you want to see your maintenance calls.

Example: If you set the scheduling period for 365 days, the system will show the calls for that plan for one year in advance. This will help with long-term planning.

Requires confirm:

When you check this powerful box, the system determines when the next object will be generated from the plan. It will only generate when the previous call object has been completed. If you do not check this box, the system will not take into consideration whether the previous object was completed and will generate the next work order on the call date assigned.

Scheduling indicator:

This indicates when to schedule your plan. It will use time, which works in conjunction with the tolerance percentages. Time key date, which will always use the actual date, and factory calendar take into consideration the working days set in the calendar entered.

Kristina Gordon is SAP PM Leader, DuPont Protective Solutions Business, and SAP WMP Champion, Spruance Site, Richmond, VA. If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

92

2:53 pm
March 13, 2017
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Mine Business Intelligence From Your CMMS

Car BoomBusiness Intelligence (BI) analysis is crucial to an operation’s success. In short, this analysis is the harnessing of software to mine an organization’s raw data. Analyzing that data through the use of reporting and analytics can support critical business decisions.

In the maintenance world, a computerized maintenance management software (CMMS) system plays a vital role in collecting useful data. Technical experts at Mapcon Technologies Inc. (Johnston, IA, mapcon.com) point to five areas where these systems can help your organization analyze and understand its valuable business intelligence and put it to use.

— Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

Inventory auditing

It’s important for maintenance personnel to know how many parts are needed and when they need to be reordered. By running an inventory usage report within a CMMS, users can find out exactly how many individual parts were used over a specific period of time. Once that information is gathered, a minimum number, or reorder point, of parts can be established to trigger an automatic reorder that, in turn, would be approved and sent to the vendor. This can ensure that stock-outs are no longer a problem and, accordingly, prevent downtime.

randmPredictive analysis

For maintenance departments, being able to predict when equipment will fail is a big deal. A CMMS can determine, based on meter or gauge readings and historical data, when a machine is most likely to break down. Take, for example, a machine that breaks a belt approximately every 1,000 hr. Since a CMMS would display that trend, a technician could set up a preventive–maintenance (PM) task to change the belt every 950 hr. By using a CMMS to predict when the machine will break a belt, downtime can be avoided.

Preventive-maintenance compliance

Since PM information is stored within a CMMS, it is easy to analyze. When reviewing such data, managers can break it down by type of work done, employee, area, or other metrics, and make necessary changes. For example, by determining why certain PMs weren’t completed on time, they could take steps to hire new workers or provide additional training to current employees.

Failure analysis

A CMMS stores an extensive amount of historical data, including repairs, for each piece of equipment in a plant. Therefore, when personnel notice that machines have required numerous repairs, they can analyze stored failure codes to help determine root causes. They can also review CMMS information on when repairs were done, associated downtime, and PM activities, among other things, to devise corrective measures. Say a technician discovers that a machine breaks more belts in the winter due to colder temperatures. With this information, he or she could plan ahead and turn up the heat in the area or order more belts to have on hand during winter months.

HR (human resource) reporting

Reports within a CMMS can be run for things other than maintenance-repair information. Many software programs can run HR-related reports, i.e., an open work order by craft or shift report. This capability allows managers to view the workload according to shift or craft, something that can be beneficial when it comes to hiring decisions. MT

For more information from Mapcon Technologies on this and other CMMS topics, visit mapcon.com.

219

7:46 pm
February 10, 2017
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SAP Tips and Tricks: Assign HR Mini Masters to Work Centers

randmBy Kristina Gordon, DuPont

Tracking the hours that each maintenance employee spends on a job is essential to understanding the total cost and reliability of your equipment. An SAP HR Mini Master is primarily used for work-order time confirmation. Mini Masters are set up for everyone in your maintenance organization, then assigned to a work center. The resulting data will show you the work-center capacity down to the employee level. MT

Q: How do I create an HR Mini Master?

A :  Set up transaction PA30:

1. Click on the create icon. 1702rmcsap07p
2. Enter start date.
3. Select time recording (HR Mini Master).
4. Enter position type.
5. Enter plant code.
6. Click the save button.
7. Create Personal Data Screen appears. Enter employee name.
8. Click save.

You have now created an HR Mini Master.


Q: When do you assign an HR Mini Master to a work center?

A: HR Mini Masters are assigned to a work center when you want to schedule work at the individual level charge time to work orders using time confirmations for internal employees and contractors.


Q: How do I assign an HR Mini Master to a work center?

A: Use the following transaction IR02 steps:

Step 1

Step 1

Step 2

Step 2

Step 3

Step 3

Step 4

Step 4

Step 5

Step 5

Step 6

Step 6

Kristina Gordon is SAP Program Consultant at the DuPont, Sabine River Works plant in West Orange, TX.  If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

418

9:45 pm
January 13, 2017
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Use Catalog Profiles, Failure Codes to Analyze Assets

By Kristina Gordon, DuPont

randmDetermining why an asset failed during production is a critical function, not only for general reporting, but to measure asset costs and make informed decisions about future use. The SAP system provides an effective means of documenting the key aspects of damages, causes, tasks, and activities. Catalog profiles are used to group attributes together and allow maintenance personnel to document asset failure in the maintenance notification.

Q: What defect codes exist in the SAP catalog profile and how do you turn them on?

A :  Catalog profiles are created based on a company’s general business practices. Each company will have its own standards and naming convention and they should be followed in this setup to maintain consistency and avoid confusion.

The SAP catalog structure goes from catalog to code group to code. Each of these must be set up in the IMG (implementation guide), which is a SAP configuration. A catalog profile should be created such that it describes the equipment at a level that helps identify the possible failures associated with its particular equipment group.

Once the catalog and failure codes are configured, they are assigned to equipment masters. This will connect a catalog profile and corresponding damage or failure code to a specific equipment type, and then allow the proper failure code to be selected and added to the notification for that asset, as seen in the example below.

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As shown in the equipment-master screen (next column), the equipment description is R/V, with some identifying characteristics (identification number 531503, in this case). The catalog profile (bottom of the screen) states the profile number with the description “Valve, Safety Relief.”

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In the work-order notification generated for the equipment above, the object part goes into a more granular description of the catalog profile, “Disk”.

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Finally, the failure code for the damage can be selected. In this example, the inspection produced a “Worn” result.

SAP includes the following key transactions for viewing failure-analysis results:

• MCI5: Damages, based on damage, cause, and activity

• IW67: List of tasks completed for the damages

• IW69: List of items with damage, cause, and other catalog details

• IW65: List of activities with damage, cause, and other catalog details.

Knowing the failure rate can optimize PM intervals and improve failure response and work practices. MT

Kristina Gordon is SAP Program Consultant at the DuPont, Sabine River Works plant in West Orange, TX. If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

105

6:22 pm
December 22, 2016
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Link Outsiders to Documents, Folders

randmBy Kristina Gordon, DuPont

Managing documents and history is a critical part of maintaining equipment reliability.  SAP offers several methods for tracking documents, drawings, and other important information. Here are answers to two common questions that will help you better manage information.

Q: Can you insert documents in a maintenance plan and/or maintenance task list and have them available once the order is issued directly in the maintenance order? Our maintenance contractor doesn’t have access to certain SAP transactions or maintenance task lists but needs to use maintenance procedures, manuals, and detail drawings.

A : The Document Management System (DMS) allows you to provide links outside of SAP to internal information such as equipment functional locations, materials, maintenance plans, and maintenance items. This is a robust and organized approach that ensures all documents are attached directly to the object in SAP.

Q: Can you attach an SAP object directly to a file or a folder?

A: Attaching a file allows you to connect a specific document to your work order, material, or purchase order. Attaching a folder allows you to view the entire content of the folder from a link within your object, giving you multiple selections to view and print within that folder. MT

Use these four steps to create a link that will make a folder available to an outside source.

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— Use transaction CV01N to create a document.

— Use document type “DDW,” document part “000,” and document version “00.”

— Click the enter button.

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Enter the description. This could begin with the equipment number or inventory number, but needs to easily identify the object to which the folder will be attached. Click the Create File button.

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— Use application type “HTM” (the application type will also have to be configured in SAP per your company). The description will be the same as the Document Data Description. In the first box of “Original,” add the desired data carrier. This will be the name of the “Data Carrier” your SAP team will set up. In the second box of “Original,” use the address, or folder structure, of the desired folder. Make sure to exclude the folder that the drop down would automatically take you to in the address.

— Click the green check.

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— Click the Object links tab. Click the Equipment master tab. Note: There are multiple different objects to which you can attach. We are using equipment masters as an example for this demo. Enter the desired equipment ID in the equipment field. More than one equipment ID can be added if necessary. The process is completed after clicking the save button.

— You will now be able to view the folder within the equipment master that was attached as the link.

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— To create a link to a file, the setup is very similar to that for folders. However, note the following differences:

— The application type will be the type of document that is being linked (Word, Excel, etc.)

— Description will have the desired description of the document.

— The first box of “Original” will contain the data carrier.

— In the second box of “Original,” first select the drop-down box. This will open a browser. Go to file location and click “open.” Your link will be uploaded. Follow the steps in the previous screen shots to completion.

Kristina Gordon is SAP Program Consultant at the DuPont, Sabine River Works plant in West Orange, TX. If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

144

5:52 pm
November 15, 2016
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SAP Material Masters: How do they integrate with the rest of your ERP system?

Someone once told me that the material master is the center of the universe in SAP. There is much truth to that statement.

randmIn dealing with multiple maintenance plants all over the country, the biggest issues I see after an implementation are how the material masters for maintenance were set up. Material masters integrate with every process of your ERP system. They can control a portion of your financials, affect your work orders, wreak havoc with purchasing, and create a situation in which your company is non-compliant with regulations on PSM (process-safety management). What follows is a common, yet critical, issue regarding safety stock.

Material 123 has a safety stock set in the material master (transaction MM02) for a quantity of nine. Someone at the site puts in a reservation for a quantity of 10. We will call this individual person A. Person B puts in a reservation for the same material for a quantity of nine. Person B gets the material delivered from the storeroom to the required area on the same day that it has been reserved. Person A waits for an extended period and doesn’t understand why he is not receiving the materials he ordered.

Material 123 has a safety stock set in the material master (transaction MM02) for a quantity of nine. Person A wants 10 units of Material 123. Person B wants nine units.

Material 123 has a safety stock set in the material master (transaction MM02) for a quantity of nine. Person A wants 10 units of Material 123. Person B wants nine units.

There are two problems with this scenario.

The storeroom receives all reservations for materials through a transaction, MB25. This screen shows by work order, cost center, or requester what material is being requested and the delivery date for which the requirement should be filled.

All reservations for materials are received through a transaction, MB25. This screen shows by work order, cost center, or requester what material is being requested and the delivery date for which the requirement should be filled.

All reservations for materials are received through a transaction, MB25. This screen shows by work order, cost center, or requester what material is being requested and the delivery date for which the requirement should be filled.

If the inventory clerk does not have the requirements date set in order, it is possible that orders are filled out of order. In this situation, person A should have had the requirements filled before person B.

The second problem occurs when MRP (materials-requirements planning) is running. SAP will see that the safety stock is set at a quantity of nine. Therefore, that is all that the system will ever try to keep in stock. When A and B entered a total requirement quantity of 19, the quantity of nine in stock will be issued and MRP will create a requisition for the remaining amount. However, this will still produce a deficit, as the safety stock requires nine.

To assure persons A and B receive the units they need, the site should run transaction MC44. This will generate the exact number of inventory turns in a period, per material.

To assure persons A and B receive the units they need, the site should run transaction MC44. This will generate the exact number of inventory turns in a period, per material.

To fix this problem, the site should run transaction MC44. This will generate the exact number of inventory turns in a period, per material. It shows that the material is consumed at a rate higher than the safety stock setting and will allow the analysis and data to confirm that the safety stock should be increased to a number that will meet the site’s requirements.

Ensuring that safety stock is set to an accurate number can reduce the amount of purchase requisitions created and assure that orders are filled in a timely manner to meet requirements and, in parallel jobs, will not be delayed. MT

Kristina Gordon is SAP Program Consultant at the DuPont, Sabine River Works plant in West Orange, TX. If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

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