Archive | CMMS

45

6:35 pm
June 16, 2017
Print Friendly

SAP Tips and Tricks: Improve Efficiency with Equipment Bill of Materials

randmBy Kristina Gordon, DuPont

A bill of materials (BOM) is a list of items used to perform maintenance activities. There are different types of BOMs, as they are often called but, in maintenance functions, we generally use equipment BOMs. This material list is created in a hierarchal manner and associated with one specific piece of equipment. BOMs can also be created for functional locations, making it efficient to select materials.

The second type of BOM is associated with a material type called an IBAU. This is a maintenance assembly list created by using individual parts tied to a higher-level material instead of an equipment master or functional location.

Creating a good BOM can be a critical factor in completing work for a piece of equipment. It will, at a glance, make it possible to identify the materials needed to service that piece of equipment.

In the following example, you will learn how to create a bill of material and how to display it in your work order.

Transaction IB01

Enter the equipment master number for the bill of materials you wish to create, plant code, and BOM usage 4 (plant-maintenance usage), and the date you wish to make your BOM valid from.

Click the enter button.

1706rmcsap01p

Add the following information

• ICT: This indicates the status of the material, i.e., stock (L), non-stock (N) or text (T).
• Component: This is your material master number.
• Quantity: Number of components needed to service the equipment
• UN: Unit of measure for how you receive the material

Once finished, click the save button.

1706rmcsap02p

You will have the ability to see the new materials on the BOM you created under the functional location in which the equipment is installed (transaction IH01).

1706rmcsap03p

When creating a maintenance work order for the equipment, pull up the materials on the BOM by using the list button on the components tab of the work order.

1706rmcsap04p

This automatically lists the materials on the BOM. Select the check box for the materials that you wish to carry into your work order. Click the green check mark.

1706rmcsap05p

Your materials populate in your work order.

1706rmcsap06p

Note that a ritual should be built around updating your BOMs on a frequency. This allows new materials, or materials with different specifications, which will also have a new material master number, to be added and any materials no longer applicable to be deleted. This can be completed in transaction IB02, change bill of materials. MT

Kristina Gordon is SAP Program Consultant at the DuPont, Sabine River Works plant in West Orange, TX. If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

142

7:43 pm
May 15, 2017
Print Friendly

SAP Tips and Tricks: Manage Assets with Refurbishment Order

By Kristina Gordon, DuPont

randmWhen assets need to be refurbished or fabricated, SAP offers an order type called a Refurbishment Order. The purpose of this order is to assist sending the item to a repair shop, either on or off site; having that asset repaired or fabricated; and then receiving it back into inventory at a different valuation or cost. The new store-room inventory value will be based on the cost charged to the refurbishment work order.

Name a work order type by whatever nomenclature your company uses. In this example, we will call the refurbishment work order type WO10. When creating and executing a refurbishment work order, follow these steps from creation to closure. Note that some of the transaction codes used here are finance- and costing-based. Such steps may be designated only by your finance department.

1. Set up transaction IW81 (standard SAP transaction code for refurbishment):

1704rmcsap01p

2. Fill in the needed information (note that the screen layout looks very different from a work order created in IW31):

1704rmcsap02p

3. Create the operation steps for internal labor and a line with your PO information for outside services:

1704rmcsap03p

4. Add the asset/material to the work-order components, then release and save the order:

1704rmcsap04p

5. Once work is completed and the asset/material is ready to be returned into inventory, confirm the internal labor hours to the work order that was added in step 3, using transaction IW41.

6. Add actual overhead to the work order using transaction KG12:

1704rmcsap05p

7. After time confirmations are completed and material movements have been made, TECO the work order.

8. Using Transaction IW8W, return the material back to inventory.

9. It is now time to financially settle the work order. This will also change the value of the material in inventory (Note that this screen looks very similar to the overhead calculation screen in KG12):

1704rmcsap06p

Creating and executing a refurbishment order is more labor-intensive than normal work-order types. However, refurbishment orders will keep your inventory value correct and maintain complete tracking and history of the work performed on the asset. MT

Kristina Gordon is SAP PM Leader, DuPont Protective Solutions Business, and SAP WMP Champion, Spruance Site, Richmond, VA. If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

500

2:22 pm
May 15, 2017
Print Friendly

Facilities vs. Factory Maintenance: Is There a Difference?

1705ffacilitymain

The common denominators boil down to assurance of reliable equipment assets and successful delivery of product.

By Jeffrey S. Nevenhoven, Life Cycle Engineering (LCE)

Among reliability and maintenance (R&M) professionals, there are many opinions about the universal or, more precisely, not-so-universal nature of maintenance practices. We’ve all heard statements along the lines of “this organization is different,” “we’re not like them,” or “those best practices won’t work or fit here.” One perception shared by many working in the R&M trenches is that maintenance in a batch-processing manufacturing environment is considerably different from maintenance in a continuous-flow operation. Another common perception is that maintenance principles and practices within the world of non-manufacturing facilities differ greatly from those in a manufacturing organization. But do they really?

At first glance, those strongly held beliefs might seem justifiable. Below the surface, however, the inner workings of any organization are quite similar when it comes to R&M requirements. Why, then, do so many people contend that reliability and maintenance are handled differently within distinct organization types? A number of factors drive those beliefs, including operating environment, regulatory requirements, organizational structure, leadership style, business priorities, expectations, and past practice. On top of that, many influences figure into the perception that something will or will not work within a specific organization.

In reality, physical assets are void of emotion and thought. Regardless of location or organization type, such assets need to be operated and maintained appropriately and, in turn, be available to deliver reliable service, as required. Without reliability, business risks increase, asset-performance levels decrease, and costs escalate.

So different, but so similar

Assets, systems, procedures, departments, and workers exist to produce a product or service, regardless of organization type. In the healthcare sector, the product is patient experience. Within amusement, entertainment, and sports markets, it is fan/customer experience. Within the travel industry, it’s passenger experience. Within the education system, the deliverable is student experience. And, within manufacturing, the product is ultimately consumer experience.

Consider, for example, two starkly different environments: a healthcare operation and a refinery. On the exterior, a healthcare organization, such as a hospital, looks very different from an oil-and-gas refinery. Hospitals consist, primarily, of aesthetically appealing buildings and grounds while oil refineries consist of tanks, piping, and other industrial-looking structures. As we enter these operations, noticeable differences still exist.

Inside the hospital, we observe doctors, nurses, patients, and other healthcare professionals at work. At the refinery, we see operators, crafts, engineers, and other industry specialists performing their duties. One facility encompasses exam, emergency, and operating rooms, labs, registration desks, and waiting areas, while the other encompasses control rooms, repair facilities, material storage areas, and production equipment and environments.

Once we look beyond the exterior differences, though, similarities become more noticeable. Despite one organization focusing on patient health and the other on refining crude oil, both share a long list of common business practices, have comparable organizational structures, and utilize physical assets. Both are delivering a product, and both require reliable, well-maintained equipment to do it.

Healthcare operations, such as hospitals, fall under the category of facilities maintenance, or facility management, while refineries in the oil-and-gas industry fall under the factory-maintenance category. Despite the differences in form, fit, and function, these operations are very much alike when it comes to sustaining maintenance requirements. After all, the maintenance processes and practices to ensure that the HVAC system in a hospital is operational and reliable are similar to the efforts required to ensure the reliability and operation of a refinery’s cooling system.

The HVAC system in a hospital’s operating room requires the utmost care and reliability. Temperatures and airflow must be regulated within specific parameters throughout the entire surgical procedure to help prevent infection and promote healing of a patient. If the HVAC system is not working reliably, entire operating suites can be shut down, resulting in canceled surgeries, reallocation of patients to other hospitals, and even possible litigation and damage to reputation.

The process of refining crude oil into consumer fuels and other products entails several chemical-process steps that generate enormous amounts of heat and pressure. The cooling-water system, which is associated with a cooling tower, helps control these extreme temperatures and pressures by transferring heat from hot process fluids to the cooling system. Much like the HVAC system, the cooling tower is a critical asset that requires reliable operation. Unless it performs reliably, product delivery, product quality, energy consumption, the environment, and employee safety can be severely compromised.

Have the parallels between these different types of organizations become clearer?

Maintenance 101

A hospital HVAC system and a refinery cooling tower incorporate mechanical, electronic-control, transmission, and power systems, all of which need to be maintained properly. To achieve this, facility-maintenance departments and their factory-maintenance counterparts need to ensure that the following foundational methods are established and functioning well. Think of these methods as “focusing on the fundamentals” or “the blocking and tackling” of maintenance:

Asset-care program. Most assets within any organization require some level of preventive care. This includes routine cleaning, lubrication, inspection, and adjustment to maintain reliable operation which invariably includes time-based and condition-based maintenance. This should all be documented and monitored through the maintenance strategy program.

Work-management system. The work-management system encompasses the framework, infrastructure, processes, and resources needed to manage asset-care activities, reactive or proactive. It provides the means to identify, prioritize, perform, document, and report work.

Planning and scheduling function. The planning and scheduling function defines the what, how, who, and when for proactive-maintenance work activities. The collective effort of planning and scheduling aims to minimize asset downtime, improve workforce efficiency and, reduce maintenance-induced failures.

Stores (MRO) inventory-management function. To effectively fulfill its mission, the maintenance function requires reliable and prompt material support. A proficiently managed MRO (maintenance, repair, and operations) inventory storeroom contributes to improved equipment reliability, workforce efficiency, and cost control.

Reliability engineering. The reliability engineering function is responsible for driving out sources of repetitive failure. Its mission is to provide leadership and technical expertise required to achieve and sustain optimum reliability, maintainability, useful life, and life-cycle cost for an organization’s assets.

Computerized maintenance-management system (CMMS). Proactive-maintenance organizations use data to effectively handle work activities, report performance, track costs, and enable continuous improvement efforts. The CMMS automates these processes, captures data, and provides information required to enable resource productivity and asset reliability.

Universal application

Regardless of where an asset resides, reliability depends on core reliability and maintenance fundamentals that span all industries and organizational types. Whatever the assets may be, i.e., motors, pumps, compressors, robots, conveyors, boilers, elevators, escalators, pelletizers, utilities, mobile equipment, fire-suppression systems, rotary-tablet presses, chillers, rolling mills, roadways, buildings, you name it, all require specific amounts of downtime for proactive preventive- and predictive-maintenance activities, including, but not limited to, replacement of wear parts, rebuilds, upgrades, and other improvements. Levels of maintenance may vary by organization type, but the fundamental requirement for it is universal. MT

A senior consultant with Life Cycle Engineering, Charleston, SC, Jeff Nevenhoven helps clients align organizational systems, structures, and leadership styles with business goals. Contact him at jnevenhoven@LCE.com.


learnmore2“Alignment Connects Individuals to Organization Objectives”

“Managing Your Value Stream”

“Get to the Root of the Cause”

“Profiles Reveal Reliability Trends”

471

3:09 pm
March 13, 2017
Print Friendly

SAP Tips and Tricks: Maintenance Plans — What do all the fields mean?

By Kristina Gordon, DuPont

SAP Maintenance Plans determine how and when a work order or notification will be generated. (Object or notifications will be referred to as objects in this article.) The scheduling parameter settings within the maintenance plan you create dictate these rules. In response to several questions I’ve received about what should be entered and what the value represents, the following screen shot and definitions describe, in detail, the scheduling parameter settings that should be used in a typical maintenance plan. MT

1703rmcsap01p

SF (shift factor) later confirmation:

Based on the percentage entered, this will dictate the next plan date, or due date, of the maintenance plan if an object confirmation has been completed after the original due date.

Example: If the due date for a plan, generated on an object, is Jan. 1, and the maintenance plan is on a 30-day scheduling frequency, however the work and confirmation of that work is not completed until Jan. 15, a 100% late SF will generate the next object on Feb. 15, 30 days after the confirmation. If the SF later confirmation is set at 0%, then the next work order will generate on the scheduling frequency of 30 days without a shift factor calculated in, meaning the work order will generate on Feb. 1.

SF earlier confirmation:

The same rules apply as above, only this formula will calculate based on early confirmation of a work order. If set at 100% and the work is performed 15 days early, the next object will be generated 15 days earlier than the original plan date. If set at 0%, the original plan date will stay the same.

randmTolerance (+):

This determines the difference between the actual completion date and the planned date.

Example: If you set a 20% tolerance on a plan that has a scheduling frequency of 30 days, the calculation the system will use is 30 days x 20% = 6 days. That means you have a 6-day “float” period that is accepted by the system and will not affect scheduling. If you complete the job and confirm the work 6 days early, the plan will not change, i.e., the dates are in the acceptable range.

Tolerance (-):

As in the above example, the parentage calculation applies and will allow a 6-day float after the plan date.

Cycle modification factor:

This calculation is used when implementing maintenance strategies. If you have a cycle duration of 60 days, but want a plan to generate in 90 days, set the cycle modification to 1.5. This will allow the plan to generate an object in 90 days while the other plans on the same strategy will generate in 60 days. The calculation used for this example is 60 days x 1.5 = 90 days.

Factory calendar:

The factory calendar dictates when the system will process scheduling. Factory calendars can be set in the header data of the maintenance plan or at the planning plant item level.

Example: If the factory calendar is set at a 5-day workweek calendar with holidays, object will not accept confirmations on non-working days (this would include weekends and holidays). You will receive a system error message “not a working day.” To avoid this, a factory calendar should be created for maintenance that allows a 7-day, 24-hour working schedule.

Call horizon:

The calculation used in this field will determine how far in advance an object is generated before the plan due date.

Example: On a 30-day plan, if the call horizon is set at 25%, the work order will generate 21 days before the plan due date of the object. It is very important to set your call horizon so that an object is generated so that the job can be planned well in advance of the plan due date.

Scheduling period:

The scheduling period indicates, in days, months, or years, how far in advance you want to see your maintenance calls.

Example: If you set the scheduling period for 365 days, the system will show the calls for that plan for one year in advance. This will help with long-term planning.

Requires confirm:

When you check this powerful box, the system determines when the next object will be generated from the plan. It will only generate when the previous call object has been completed. If you do not check this box, the system will not take into consideration whether the previous object was completed and will generate the next work order on the call date assigned.

Scheduling indicator:

This indicates when to schedule your plan. It will use time, which works in conjunction with the tolerance percentages. Time key date, which will always use the actual date, and factory calendar take into consideration the working days set in the calendar entered.

Kristina Gordon is SAP PM Leader, DuPont Protective Solutions Business, and SAP WMP Champion, Spruance Site, Richmond, VA. If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

100

2:53 pm
March 13, 2017
Print Friendly

Mine Business Intelligence From Your CMMS

Car BoomBusiness Intelligence (BI) analysis is crucial to an operation’s success. In short, this analysis is the harnessing of software to mine an organization’s raw data. Analyzing that data through the use of reporting and analytics can support critical business decisions.

In the maintenance world, a computerized maintenance management software (CMMS) system plays a vital role in collecting useful data. Technical experts at Mapcon Technologies Inc. (Johnston, IA, mapcon.com) point to five areas where these systems can help your organization analyze and understand its valuable business intelligence and put it to use.

— Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

Inventory auditing

It’s important for maintenance personnel to know how many parts are needed and when they need to be reordered. By running an inventory usage report within a CMMS, users can find out exactly how many individual parts were used over a specific period of time. Once that information is gathered, a minimum number, or reorder point, of parts can be established to trigger an automatic reorder that, in turn, would be approved and sent to the vendor. This can ensure that stock-outs are no longer a problem and, accordingly, prevent downtime.

randmPredictive analysis

For maintenance departments, being able to predict when equipment will fail is a big deal. A CMMS can determine, based on meter or gauge readings and historical data, when a machine is most likely to break down. Take, for example, a machine that breaks a belt approximately every 1,000 hr. Since a CMMS would display that trend, a technician could set up a preventive–maintenance (PM) task to change the belt every 950 hr. By using a CMMS to predict when the machine will break a belt, downtime can be avoided.

Preventive-maintenance compliance

Since PM information is stored within a CMMS, it is easy to analyze. When reviewing such data, managers can break it down by type of work done, employee, area, or other metrics, and make necessary changes. For example, by determining why certain PMs weren’t completed on time, they could take steps to hire new workers or provide additional training to current employees.

Failure analysis

A CMMS stores an extensive amount of historical data, including repairs, for each piece of equipment in a plant. Therefore, when personnel notice that machines have required numerous repairs, they can analyze stored failure codes to help determine root causes. They can also review CMMS information on when repairs were done, associated downtime, and PM activities, among other things, to devise corrective measures. Say a technician discovers that a machine breaks more belts in the winter due to colder temperatures. With this information, he or she could plan ahead and turn up the heat in the area or order more belts to have on hand during winter months.

HR (human resource) reporting

Reports within a CMMS can be run for things other than maintenance-repair information. Many software programs can run HR-related reports, i.e., an open work order by craft or shift report. This capability allows managers to view the workload according to shift or craft, something that can be beneficial when it comes to hiring decisions. MT

For more information from Mapcon Technologies on this and other CMMS topics, visit mapcon.com.

355

7:46 pm
February 10, 2017
Print Friendly

SAP Tips and Tricks: Assign HR Mini Masters to Work Centers

randmBy Kristina Gordon, DuPont

Tracking the hours that each maintenance employee spends on a job is essential to understanding the total cost and reliability of your equipment. An SAP HR Mini Master is primarily used for work-order time confirmation. Mini Masters are set up for everyone in your maintenance organization, then assigned to a work center. The resulting data will show you the work-center capacity down to the employee level. MT

Q: How do I create an HR Mini Master?

A :  Set up transaction PA30:

1. Click on the create icon. 1702rmcsap07p
2. Enter start date.
3. Select time recording (HR Mini Master).
4. Enter position type.
5. Enter plant code.
6. Click the save button.
7. Create Personal Data Screen appears. Enter employee name.
8. Click save.

You have now created an HR Mini Master.


Q: When do you assign an HR Mini Master to a work center?

A: HR Mini Masters are assigned to a work center when you want to schedule work at the individual level charge time to work orders using time confirmations for internal employees and contractors.


Q: How do I assign an HR Mini Master to a work center?

A: Use the following transaction IR02 steps:

Step 1

Step 1

Step 2

Step 2

Step 3

Step 3

Step 4

Step 4

Step 5

Step 5

Step 6

Step 6

Kristina Gordon is SAP Program Consultant at the DuPont, Sabine River Works plant in West Orange, TX.  If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

525

9:45 pm
January 13, 2017
Print Friendly

Use Catalog Profiles, Failure Codes to Analyze Assets

By Kristina Gordon, DuPont

randmDetermining why an asset failed during production is a critical function, not only for general reporting, but to measure asset costs and make informed decisions about future use. The SAP system provides an effective means of documenting the key aspects of damages, causes, tasks, and activities. Catalog profiles are used to group attributes together and allow maintenance personnel to document asset failure in the maintenance notification.

Q: What defect codes exist in the SAP catalog profile and how do you turn them on?

A :  Catalog profiles are created based on a company’s general business practices. Each company will have its own standards and naming convention and they should be followed in this setup to maintain consistency and avoid confusion.

The SAP catalog structure goes from catalog to code group to code. Each of these must be set up in the IMG (implementation guide), which is a SAP configuration. A catalog profile should be created such that it describes the equipment at a level that helps identify the possible failures associated with its particular equipment group.

Once the catalog and failure codes are configured, they are assigned to equipment masters. This will connect a catalog profile and corresponding damage or failure code to a specific equipment type, and then allow the proper failure code to be selected and added to the notification for that asset, as seen in the example below.

1701rmcsap01p

As shown in the equipment-master screen (next column), the equipment description is R/V, with some identifying characteristics (identification number 531503, in this case). The catalog profile (bottom of the screen) states the profile number with the description “Valve, Safety Relief.”

1701rmcsap02p

In the work-order notification generated for the equipment above, the object part goes into a more granular description of the catalog profile, “Disk”.

1701rmcsap03p

Finally, the failure code for the damage can be selected. In this example, the inspection produced a “Worn” result.

SAP includes the following key transactions for viewing failure-analysis results:

• MCI5: Damages, based on damage, cause, and activity

• IW67: List of tasks completed for the damages

• IW69: List of items with damage, cause, and other catalog details

• IW65: List of activities with damage, cause, and other catalog details.

Knowing the failure rate can optimize PM intervals and improve failure response and work practices. MT

Kristina Gordon is SAP Program Consultant at the DuPont, Sabine River Works plant in West Orange, TX. If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

Navigation