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62

7:46 pm
February 10, 2017
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SAP Tips and Tricks: Assign HR Mini Masters to Work Centers

randmBy Kristina Gordon, DuPont

Tracking the hours that each maintenance employee spends on a job is essential to understanding the total cost and reliability of your equipment. An SAP HR Mini Master is primarily used for work-order time confirmation. Mini Masters are set up for everyone in your maintenance organization, then assigned to a work center. The resulting data will show you the work-center capacity down to the employee level. MT

Q: How do I create an HR Mini Master?

A :  Set up transaction PA30:

1. Click on the create icon. 1702rmcsap07p
2. Enter start date.
3. Select time recording (HR Mini Master).
4. Enter position type.
5. Enter plant code.
6. Click the save button.
7. Create Personal Data Screen appears. Enter employee name.
8. Click save.

You have now created an HR Mini Master.


Q: When do you assign an HR Mini Master to a work center?

A: HR Mini Masters are assigned to a work center when you want to schedule work at the individual level charge time to work orders using time confirmations for internal employees and contractors.


Q: How do I assign an HR Mini Master to a work center?

A: Use the following transaction IR02 steps:

Step 1

Step 1

Step 2

Step 2

Step 3

Step 3

Step 4

Step 4

Step 5

Step 5

Step 6

Step 6

Kristina Gordon is SAP Program Consultant at the DuPont, Sabine River Works plant in West Orange, TX.  If you have SAP questions, send them to editors@maintenancetechnology.com and we’ll forward them to Kristina.

47

9:01 pm
February 9, 2017
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On The Floor: Real-World Views on ISO 55001

By Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

Has your organization adopted the ISO 55001 Asset Management Standard, and why or why not?

Has your organization adopted the ISO 55001 Asset Management Standard, and why or why not?

Inquiring minds want to know: This month we wanted to gauge the impact that the ISO 55000 Asset Management Standard (specifically ISO 55001) is having on MT Reader Panelist’s operations (or the operations of their clients/customers). Despite the buzz about this Standard (including regular information in our pages), our Panelists’ responses reflect a mixed bag of awareness and adoption. We asked them to reply in detail to these questions:

• Were they and their organizations (or their clients/customers) aware of ISO 55001 and did they expect the organizations to adopt this Standard?

• Pursuant to ISO 55001, did everyone (all departments) in their organizations (or those of their clients/customers) understand the role of Maintenance and vice versa, as well as understand how they should all work with each other?

Here, edited for brevity and clarity, are several responses we received.

College Electrical Lab, Manager/Instructor, West…

We have reviewed ISO 55000 (55001, 55002) for possible adoption. The system we use for asset management is part of our CMMS program. We might not adopt ISO 55000 until we complete a full ROI evaluation. Weighting the costs against the benefits is a big issue with us. Will this ISO Standard add to our bottom line, customer service, product quality, and employee benefits? An evaluation team is working on it now.

Our maintenance departments are considered a profit center for the overall organization. A maintenance representative attends all meetings (executive, customer, engineering, sales, planning, etc.). Any maintenance person can add input to support our growth and quality of operations.  The ISO 55000 Standards are said to improve planning, support risk management, align the processes, and improve cross-disciplinary teamwork.  If they are highly usable, we will adopt.

Industry Consultant, West…

None of my current clients have any interest in ISO 55001. Some know a bit about it, but they aren’t interested in moving forward. When ISO 55000 was first introduced, one client thought it [the company] would want to be on the leading edge of the movement [to adopt the Standard], but was never able to obtain the funding or boardroom support to take it on.

Engineer, Process Industries, Southeast…

There is very little or no awareness of ISO 55001 [at our site], and there’s been no discussion about it. We are ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 certified, and these Standards seem to draw all of our attention and resources.

Our departments, for the most part, work well with each other and understand their own roles and those of others. But there’s still a tendency to ask Maintenance to do everything that Production or other departments cannot or will not do.

Industry Consultant, International…

The ISO 55000, 1 and 2 series of Standards are relatively new, say compared to the ISO 9000 or ISO 14000. As a consultant, I know my clients are aware of the ISO 55000 series, but they’re still trying to implement maintenance and reliability best practices on lubrication, planning, work control, OEE (overall equipment effectiveness), etc.

While ISO 55000 is built around Asset Management principles, in answer to the first question, my clients aren’t ready to adopt something that doesn’t show a solid ROI on the initial costs. The process is quite rigorous.

As for the second question, I’ve noticed that Maintenance often isn’t fully aware of production requirements and, with regard to other departments, tends to work in a “silo.” Goals are frequently short-term and counter-productive in nature.

I’ve also noted that equipment “ownership” by Production operators supports Maintenance in routine work such as basic lube, minor adjustments, and inspections. I’ve even seen Operator nameplates on equipment showing the pride that the “owners” of units take in their machines or processes. Some operators will also include a mechanic or electrician as “Co-Owner.” These owners are very proud of their equipment’s performance, uptime, and machine condition. (One of my clients took this concept to very high level and generated excellent results in productivity, safety, and cost control.)

In my opinion, since Asset Management is a key to economics and bottom-line improvements. ISO 55000, 1 and 2, will eventually be adopted by more organizations. However, as with ISO 9000, Quality Measurement, it will require a bit more time and training [for ISO 55000] to take hold.

Plant Engineer, Institutional Facilities, Midwest…

Personally, I’m not particularly familiar with ISO 55001 and not sure if any of our senior managers know about it.

Regarding the second question, our institution has always held meetings with all maintenance and management departments to keep everyone involved with any ongoing, new, or future projects. Each department has its own type of maintenance, and the type used depends greatly on cost, man/woman power, and order of importance.

Reliability Specialist, Power Sector, Midwest…

Yes, our organization is fully aware of ISO 55001. As with most organizations in the power industry, we are heavily regulated by the PSC, NREC, FERC, insurance carriers, and other entities. Until one of them mandates compliance to ISO 55001, most organizations won’t make the investment.

All departments in our organization understand their own roles and their responsibilities to each other. Each department has its own mission statement, and partnership agreements have been formed and documented with one another.

Maintenance & Reliability Specialist, Engineering Services Provider, South…

My company is very aware of ISO 55001 and in fact had a representative on the team that developed the Standard. Our [my particular] customer is only aware of it through discussions with us. As this client is a government agency that hasn’t been required to adopt ISO 55001, at this point, I don’t believe it will do so in the near future. Due to a tight budget, I don’t believe the client sees the value in adopting a new ISO standard, since it already is involved with ISO 9001.

Given the fact that we are a maintenance and operations service provider, I believe that all departments within our organization understand the role of Maintenance. We have made a concerted effort to have as many people as possible take the CMRP exam after completing our introductory asset-management course. This ensures that we can all talk the same language and equally understand our customers’ needs in the maintenance arena. MT

About The MT Reader Panel

The Maintenance Technology Reader Panel included approximately 100 reliability and maintenance professionals and suppliers to industry who have volunteered to answer monthly questions prepared by our editorial staff. Panelist identities are not revealed and their responses are not necessarily projectable. Our panel welcomes new members. To be considered, email your name and contact information to jalexander@maintenancetechnology.com with “Reader Panel” in the subject line. All panelists are automatically included in an annual cash-prize drawing after one year of active participation.

19

9:00 am
November 29, 2016
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Small Cabinet Coolers

1611mtprod09pA line of small 316 stainless-steel cabinet cooler systems keep electrical enclosures cool with 20 F air while resisting heat and corrosion that could affect internal components. The coolers mount through a standard electrical knockout while maintaining the NEMA 12, 4, or 4X enclosure rating. Systems include an automatic drain filter separator to ensure no moisture passes to the inside. Coolers are available with capacities of 275 and 550 Btu/hr.
EXAIR Corp.
Cincinnati
exair.com

74

7:04 pm
November 15, 2016
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Rockwell Automation Commits $12M to FIRST Program

From left to right, following the announcement of his company's $12M, commitment to FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), Rockwell Automation president and CEO Blake Moret is shown with several FIRST teams, Don Bossi, president and CEO, FIRST, and  and Jay Flores, Rockwell Automation global STEM ambassador, on the 2016 Automation Fair show floor.

From left to right, following the announcement of his company’s $12M, commitment to FIRST, Rockwell Automation president and CEO Blake Moret is shown with several FIRST teams, Don Bossi, president and CEO, FIRST, and and Jay Flores, Rockwell Automation global STEM ambassador, on the product-exhibition show floor at 2016 Automation Fair.

Rockwell Automation has never shied away from putting its muscle and money where its mouth is when it comes to developing the workforce of the future. The latest example is the company’s announcement of a $12M, four-year commitment to FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology).

Highlighted at the recent Automation Fair event in Atlanta, this new $12M investment amounts to one of the largest gifts ever for FIRST, which focuses on boosting young people’s interest and participation in science and technology.

According to Donald E. Bossi, president of FIRST, the generous, multiyear commitment will help scale the organization’s programs and expose participants to a broader range of industry-leading products and applications.

A Long History of Support
Rockwell Automation has provided more than $15M of broad-based support over the past 10 years to address the critical need to fill science, technology, education and math (STEM) jobs that drive innovation. Many of these jobs go unfilled because of both the lack of awareness of the kinds of high-tech jobs available, and the lack of skills to qualify for today’s needs.

“Through our technology and people, we are helping to inspire the next generation of innovators to fill the talent pipeline for our customers and for our company,” said Blake Moret, President and CEO, Rockwell Automation. “Our strategic partnership with FIRST helps us increase our reach and visibility to STEM students around the world.”

(CLICK HERE to view “Engineering Our Future,” a short video about the company’s philosophy and approach, narrated by Rockwell Automation STEM Ambassador Jay Flores.)

In addition to being a global sponsor of the FIRST LEGO League program and sole sponsor of the FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) Rockwell Automation Innovation in Control Award, nearly 200 Rockwell Automation employees around the world donate their time for the FIRST programs, and more than 300 employees volunteer for the organization in other capacities. The company also donates products integral to FIRST program games and scoring. These product donations are specifically used for the FIRST Robotics Competition playing fields and scoring systems and are included within the parts kits that teams use to build their robots.

Rockwell Automation is recognized as a FIRST Strategic Partner, which signifies the highest levels of sponsorship available at FIRST. It is also a FIRST Robotics Competition Crown Supplier.

More About FIRST
Inventor Dean Kamen founded FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) in 1989 to promote an appreciation of science and technology in young people.

Based in Manchester, NH, FIRST designs accessible, innovative programs to build self-confidence, knowledge, and life skills while motivating young people to pursue opportunities in science, technology, and engineering. With support from over 200 of the Fortune 500 companies and more than $30 million in college scholarships, the not-for-profit organization hosts the FIRST Robotics Competition for students in Grades 9-12; FIRST Tech Challenge for Grades 7-12; FIRST LEGO League for Grades 4-8; and FIRST LEGO League Jr. for Grades K-4. FIRST’s Gracious Professionalism efforts focus on a way of doing things that encourages high-quality work, emphasizes the value of others, and respects individuals and the community.

To learn more, go to firstinspires.org, or CLICK HERE.

 

416

5:26 pm
November 15, 2016
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Heed Design Letters When Replacing Motors

By Mike Howell, Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA)

Too often, replacement specifications for three-phase squirrel-cage induction motors cover only basic nameplate data such as power, speed, voltage, and frame size, while overlooking other important performance characteristics such as the design letter. This can lead to misapplication of a motor, causing poor performance, inoperability, or failures that result in unnecessary downtime. To avoid these problems, familiarize yourself with the following speed-torque characteristics and typical applications for design letters that NEMA and IEC commonly use for small and medium machines (up to about several hundred kilowatts/horsepower).

NEMA Designs A and B, IEC Design N

• Characteristics include low starting torque, normal starting current, low slip, and relatively high efficiency. (Slip, the difference between rotor speed and synchronous speed, is necessary to produce torque. As load torque increases, slip increases.)
• NEMA Design A typically has higher starting current and lower maximum torque than NEMA Design B and IEC Design N.
• Typical applications include fans, pumps, and compressors where starting torque requirements are relatively low.

randmNEMA Design C, IEC Design H

•Characteristics include high starting torque, low starting current, and medium slip (achieved by using a double-cage, high-resistance rotor design).
• The high-resistance rotor results in greater losses at normal operating speed and, consequently, lower efficiency than NEMA Designs A and B and IEC Design N.
• Typical applications include conveyors, crushers, reciprocating pumps, and compressors that require starting under load.

1116rmmotor1

NEMA Design D

• Characteristics include very high starting torque, low starting current, and high slip.
• The robust rotor design typically incorporates a single-cage with brass alloy or high-resistance aluminum alloy rotor bars.
• The high-resistance rotor results in lower efficiency at the operating point.
• Typical applications include high-impact loads, sometimes involving flywheels, such as punch presses and shears. These motors see significant slip increases with increased torque, which, for example, can facilitate delivery of kinetic energy from the flywheel to the impact.

Using the wrong motor design for an application is another way of spelling trouble. For example, replacing a NEMA Design D motor in a shear application with a NEMA Design B unit can result in rapid failure, even if the power rating of the machine is doubled.

When replacing motors, give your supplier as much information as possible about the existing motor and application. If you need more information about design letters, see NEMA MG-1 and IEC 60034-12. MT

Mike Howell is a technical support specialist at the Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA), St. Louis. EASA is an international trade association of more than 1,900 electromechanical sales and service firms in 62 countries that helps members keep up to date on materials, equipment, and state-of-the art technology. For more information, visit easa.com.

143

4:59 pm
November 15, 2016
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Correctly Outfit Ball Valves, Actuators

1611rmcautomation01Ball valves are a common choice for water, chemical, and gas applications because of their relatively low cost and high temperature and pressure tolerance. To operate properly in a given application, valves and the actuators that drive them must be appropriately specified and correctly outfitted. Craig Correia of Festo (festo.com) points to several major considerations:

Pipe size
Ball valves are commonly used for applications ranging from 1/2 to 2 in. For fluid-handling applications that use plumbing larger than 2 in., butterfly valves may be more cost effective.

Media type
Chemical compatibility between the valve material and the media flowing through it is crucial. Stainless steel is often a good choice because of its high corrosion resistance. The downside to stainless steel is the added cost for the material. Brass valves, which cost less, should be considered if chemical compatibility isn’t an issue. Other common media-properties that should always be considered include state, viscosity, adhesiveness, and temperature. When you are ordering ball valves, evaluate the specifications to determine compatibility with each of these properties.

randmValve design
There are many types of ball valves, reflecting various construction materials, such as plastic and metal, and the type of disassembly. Some are available in one-, two-, or three-piece configurations. A three-piece design is commonly used if the valve needs to be disassembled easily and thoroughly checked (as in process applications where cleanliness is a high priority). One- or two-piece ball valves are typically more economical than a three-piece design.

Method of operation
Once the type of ball valve is selected, the method of opening and closing it must be chosen. Manual handles or pneumatic actuators are most common. When specifying an actuator, consider factors such as whether the media is hazardous or sticky. Most valve manufacturers offer assistance.

Single-acting, or spring-return devices use air (pneumatic) or a liquid to drive the actuator on one side of a piston. A spring on the opposite side acts to reverse the air/liquid action. Double-acting actuators use air/liquid on both sides of a piston. By changing the pressure from one side of the piston to the other, the actuator opens or closes the valve.

Pneumatic-actuator sizing depends on a facility’s available air pressure, especially if it must overcome spring compression in a single-acting actuator. A single-acting unit will have a different torque value at the beginning and end of actuation than if it were actuated only by air. It’s important to ensure that the spring is strong enough to overcome the ball-valve torque at all operation points. If the valve requires a lower torque than what the air and spring provide, the actuator is a suitable match for the valve. MT

­—Jane Alexander, Managing Editor

Ball-Valve 101

Ball valves work by rotating a metal sphere (the ball) with an empty cylinder (the bore) drilled through the center. During rotation of the ball, the bore is typically either in line with the pipe and allowing the media to flow through it, or it’s perpendicular to the pipe and blocking the flow. The valve may also sit in an intermediate position, which offers some flow control.

Sometimes referred to as a “cavity,” the bore is where chemicals, water, or gases accumulate until the valve is rotated. If the trapped fluids tend to harden or change while in the cavity, a different valve type may be necessary.

Craig Correia is head of Process Automation at Festo, Hauppauge, NY. For more information on the company’s wide range of products and services, visit www.festo.com/us. Photo courtesy Festo.

91

6:54 pm
October 28, 2016
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National Instruments Partners with SparkCognition as IIoT Transformation Matures

logo_ni-01As the IIoT transformation in manufacturing matures, more partnerships are developing and this week Austin, Tex.-based National Instruments (www.ni.com, NI) and IBM announced an agreement with SparkCognition. The goal of the collaboration, according to NI, “is to deliver an unprecedented level of interoperability among operational technology and informational technology as organizations search for better methods to manage and extend the life of aging assets in heavy machinery, power generation, process manufacturing and a variety of other industrial sectors.”

“We are excited that our platform can acquire the data and extract the features to drive SparkCognition analytics for IIoT solutions,” says Jamie Smith, director of embedded systems at NI. “Combined with existing technologies in the testbed, the addition of SparkCognition presents new ways to help automate the process of turning sensor data into business insight.”

NI may see a big opportunity with its open, software platform and SpakCognition’s machine learning products to create cost-savings for manufacturers’ in multiple industries. One industry that comes to mind is the power generation space, where I noted earlier this week that $32 billion dollars are being spent in 2016, alone, in the U.S. to build out grid distribution systems.

SparkCognition is also known quite well in the industrial machinery space, with its cognitive fingerprinting algorithm, called SparkPredict. According to a trade journal article from earlier this year, the company has been working with a major pump producer and using real-time data to provide better reliability:

SparkCognition has been working with one of the largest suppliers of industrial and environmental machinery-pumps, valves, mechanical seals to take real-time data off of their horizontal pumps and prevent future breakdown. By using three years of operational data to train on, SparkCognition’s algorithms were able to predict future failures with over five days of warning in just a few short weeks. This was a 20 fold operational improvement over existing models, which had been in development for decades by the client’s subject matter experts. The improvement was possible because of algorithmic advances in feature derivation, feature selection, and model building and ensembling—all of which come together in what we call Cognitive Fingerprinting.

This partnership seems like a good fit between two Austin-Tex. based companies with the ability to offer services and platforms to a wide range of equipment in multiple industries.

National Instruments, www.ni.com.
SparkCognition, www.sparkcognition.com.
IBM, www.ibm.com.

1601Iot_logoFor more IIoT coverage in maintenance and operations, click here! 

225

8:05 pm
October 19, 2016
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Day Two At SMRP 2016 With Maintenance Technology’s Editors

screen-shot-2016-10-18-at-4-17-30-pm

Contributing editor Michelle Segrest and editorial director Gary L. Parr return for a second day of extensive SMRP conference coverage. This record-setting conference has been filled with excellent presentations, enthusiastic attendees, and a large number of exhibitors ready to help reliability and maintenance professionals solve problems and move their operations to the world of reliability. Listen to Michelle and Gary discuss the second day of SMRP 2016 here:

 

Our coverage today also includes several interviews with exhibitors; an interview with Marc Cote, SMRP presenter and our November Voice from the Field; numerous attendees sharing what they have learned at the conference; a brief chat with Rebekah Wojac, president of Maintenance Excellence Roundtable; and an exchange with Maintenance Technology columnist Klaus Blache about his Univ. of Tennessee Reliability and Maintainability Center. If you weren’t able to attend this year’s SMRP Conference, we hope that the our coverage of the show, today and yesterday, will help you experience at least a small amount of what this annual event for reliability and maintenance professionals has to offer.


Marc Cote is Director of Maintenance and Engineering at C.B. Fleet Laboratories. He was the presenter of a training session on “Performance Metrics That Matter” at the 24th Annual SMRP Convention in Jacksonville, FL. During his presentation, Cote demonstrated best practices for managing and training people, materials management, workload management, and asset reliability. He showed how identifying key performance indicators and measuring them effectively can enhance any reliability program. This exclusive video interview highlights some of the main takeaways from his presentation. You can read more about Cote and his maintenance and reliability success in Maintenance Technology’s “Voice from the Field” feature in the November issue.


Editorial director Gary L. Parr interviews Klaus Blache, director of the Reliability & Maintainability Center at the Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville. Klaus talks about the center’s various programs, what it offers to students at three levels, and the various events they offer in conjunction with the program. For more information, contact him at kblache@utk.edu.


Editorial director Gary L. Parr interviews Rebekah Wojak, president of the Maintenance Excellence Roundtable, to learn about that organization, its activities, and its efforts to increase membership.


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